Blogs from Savannah, Georgia, United States, North America - page 4

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North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah March 19th 2016

Up nice and early around 7.30am and got the bags all packed up again, and headed downstairs for breakfast before we made the walk up Peachtree Street to the Hertz Depot to pick up our hire car. I had charged Mr. Tom Tom that Bruce had kindly lent me but I was getting concerned as I could not switch it over to US Maps (it was still on Australian maps). I figured it was because we were indoors so I took it with me as we walked to the Hertz depot hoping it would spring to life. It did not ! OMG how am I going to find my way around now ? Anyway we got to the Hertz depot and I showed him the printout of my reservation and I could not believe it but ... read more
Cracker Barrell Store in Dublin, Georgia
Park Avenue Manor
Old Savannah Trolley Tour

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah November 14th 2015

As in the last blog, I a not a historian so if I misstated anything just let me live in the ignorant bliss...here goes When you go away from the kids for the weekend you have these ideas that you will sleep in and get tons of rest. WRONG! We got things to do and places to go. FYI - It was sooo cold this morning! The first order of business was looking for coffee. Since we woke up around 7 am it was kind of hard to find a place that was open. I think Heather and Laura finally found a coffee shop around 9 am. We ate a little breakfast and headed out the door. Savannah Bike Tours Since we are staying in the historic district everything is in walking distance. Our guide's name ... read more
Riding the streets of Sav
Historic house markers
House from 1797 that has been restored

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah November 13th 2015

Funny story, Kirby and I were on FSU's campus about two weeks ago watching his double bass instructor perform at his senior concert. We parked were we normally park in front of the sorority houses. The concert was an hour and then we walked back to the car. Well, Mr. Kirby had forgotten to roll up his window so apparently someone walking by decided to stick their head in the window and rummage through our glove box and throw stuff around. The weird thing was my debit card was sitting on the middle console and they didn't take the checkbook from the glove box. I don't know what they were looking for. Anyway, Kirby and I went about the night and I promise the poor boy learned his lesson. He is a pro at self punishment ... read more
#5girlsinsavga
uh oh...
House

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah August 5th 2015

21 total hours of drove time and over 1,050 miles in! I am currently in a motel in Savannha, Georgia. The room is pretty much what you would expect for a side of the highway motel, but I unfortunately did not have much choice as it is pouring outside and camping was not going to happen. Oh well, it's a good thing I budgeted for this type of the thing in case I was not able to make it to a campground for the night. Last I left off here, I was battling a hangover which luckily faded away within a few short hours of my previous post. That was Sunday, and today is Tuesday. A lot of awesome stuff has happened between then and now! But first, let's talk about some not so good stuff. ... read more
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North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 29th 2015

An earlier article looked at some of Savannah’s squares that contain major statues, but there are over three dozen more statues and commemorations in the Historic District. We also need to consider at least the two main public parks – beautiful green spaces that contain many commemoratives. They are the smaller Emmet (or Irish) Park near the River, and the much larger Forsyth Park at the southern end of the Historic District. But first, some background ... The colour green means more than just grass to Savannah – it represents everything Irish, and that’s important, because the Irish have played important roles in Georgia’s history. Savannah’s first St Patrick’s Day parade was held in 1813, and today, with more than 350 floats, groups and marching bands, it is reputed to be the second largest one in ... read more
(1902) See details in the introductory text.
Emmet Park is next to City Hall.
view over the river from behind Emmett Park

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 26th 2015

Near to the Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport is a museum that military personnel, freedom-loving patriots of every country, and history buffs everywhere owe it to themselves to visit – the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force. It celebrates the formation, accomplishments, aircraft and heroics of that portion of the US Army Air Force that was one of the most important elements in the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II. The Eighth Air Force suffered the highest casualty rate of all US Forces during WWII – 12%, some 47,000 aircrew. It is a large two-story museum, with main exhibition areas and restaurant on the ground floor, gardens outdoors, and more specialized areas on the upper floor. We only visited the ground floor exhibitions indoors, since they were of greatest interest to us. Beginning ... read more
the entrance
The rotunda has a circular table with small models, plus numerous tributes, paintings sculptures, and flags.
We only visited the ground floor exhibitions, since they were of greatest interest to us.

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 22nd 2015

Probably the mightiest fort in 19th century America was Fort Pulaski, located on Cockspur Island at the mouth of the Savannah River, where it could protect the city farther inland. . It was named after Casimir Pulaski, the great Polish cavalry officer and hero of the American Revolution who was killed in 1779 at the Siege of Savannah. It was one of more than thirty forts built along the East Coast of the US in the years following the War of 1812, as a safeguard against future attacks by foreign powers. It was completed in 1847 after 18 years of construction at a cost of $1 million, an astronomical figure at the time. It was built on wooden pilings driven deep into the mud, and its walls were up to 11 feet (3.4 m) thick and ... read more
a closer view
Pulaski's monment in downtown Savannah
Conventional wisdom was wrong ,,, VERY WRONG.

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 19th 2015

If you have an interest in ships, sailing, or any kind of precision model building you owe it to yourself to visit the Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum which contains ship models, paintings and artifacts, mainly from the days of sail and the early days of steam travel. It is housed in an elegant 19th century Greek Revival style mansion surrounded by beautiful and peaceful gardens located at the northwest side of the National Historic District, near the end of Martin Luther King Boulevard. Originally the home of William Scarbrough, president of the Savannah Steamship Line, it later became a school, an orphanage, and the offices of the Board of Education and the Historic Savannah Foundation. On 1976 it became a National Historic Landmark, and it was acquired by the Museum in 1996. What they ... read more
The mansion of a railroad baron, it was acquired and refurbished by the Mmuseum in 1996.
It is located at the northwest side of the National Historic District, near the end of Martin Luther King Boulevard.
One enters from the classical garden behind the building..

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 6th 2015

In 1733 British General James Edward Oglethorpe arrived with 113 colonists to establish and settle a new colony, to be named after King George. They landed at the site of the present historic area and, with the help of the friendly local First Nations chief, Tomochichi, planned and established Savannah. Oglethorpe set out to make it a model settlement and colony, with 4 public squares, and guided by a series of original laws. He was extremely enlightened for his time: the following were all forbidden -- slavery, lawyers , hard liquor and Catholics, the latter because of constant pressure from the Spanish Catholic colony of Florida. All four prohibitions were eventually dropped, of course, over the years that followed. As the city grew more squares were added, so that by the mid 19th century the two ... read more
Chippewa Square is was laid out in 1815 in honour of an American victory in the War of 1812.
It's a peaceful place where the “park bench” scene from ''Forrest Gump'' was filmed.
The bronze statue of General Oglethorpe faces southward, toward the Spanish enemy.

North America » United States » Georgia » Savannah July 4th 2015

When Georgia cotton was the world standard, River Street was where cotton merchants’ offices and warehouses were located in six-storey buildings right by the docks for ease of loading the bales onto ships. The Civil War blockade 150 years ago put a temporary end to that trade, and when General Sherman captured Savannah he informed President Lincoln that the spoils of war there included about twenty-five thousand bales of cotton. After that War ended other fabrics began to displace cotton on world markets, and the riverfront area declined. The solidly-constructed buildings remained, but more than a century passed before the River Street Urban Renewal Project undertook to refurbish the neglectedstreet as a major tourist attraction. The original cobblestones were retained, and tracks were laid for an old-fashioned tourist trolley. Abandoned warehouses were transformed into a colourful ... read more
Shown are River Street, its walkway-plaza, City Hall, and the free ferry routes.
The commercial port is a couple of miles past the suspension bridge to the west of River Street.
This is the rear of City Hall (1905) as seen from Rousakis Plaza.




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