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COX'S BAZAAR

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WORLD’S LONGEST UNBROKEN BEACH
4 years ago, November 26th 2015 No: 1 Msg: #194150  
N Posts: 1
Golden sands - miles after miles, overlooked by genteel cliffs and awash with foaming waves, colorful conch shells, ponderous pagodas, delicious seafood- this is Cox's Bazar. The sea-side tourist township of Bangladesh boasting the world's longest (120km) unbroken beach sloping gently down into the blue water of the Bay of Bengal- Cox's Bazar is one of the most attractive tourist spots of the country. To north of Cox's Bazar is Chittagong and the hill districts of Bandarban and Khagrachhari, to the east is Myanmar, to the west and south is the Bay of Bengal. Ancient name of Cox's Bazar was Bakoli, Mid-seventeenth's name was PENGWA. The Rakhyne word PENGWA means yellow flower. Burmese King Monwaing attacked Cox's Bazar in 1784. He killed the Arakanese King Thamada and took control of the area. So the Arakanese left the area to take shelter in the Chittagong Hill Tracts and Patuakhali. The Government of the then East India Company appointed Captain Hiram Cox as Superintendent and assigned him to rehabilitate the Arakanese refugees. On arrival there in 1799, he defeated the Burmese king in a battle and rehabilitated the Arakanese refugees. After the war, he set up a bazar (market) in that place which was named as Cox's Bazar after him. Cox's Bazar is a town, a fishing port and district headquarters in Bangladesh. It is known for its wide sandy beach which is the world's longest natural sandy sea beach. It is an unbroken 125 km sandy sea beach with a gentle slope. It is located 150 km south of Chittagong. Cox’s Bazar is also known by the name "Panowa", the literal translation of which means "yellow flower". Its other old name was "Palongkee". The modern Cox's Bazar derives its name from Captain Cox (died 1799), an officer serving in British India. In the 18th century, an officer of British East India Company, Captain Hiram Cox was appointed as the Superintendent of Palongkee outpost after Warren Hastings became the Governor of Bengal. Captain Cox was specially mobilised to deal with a century long conflict between Arakan refugees and local Rakhains. The Captain was a compassionate soul and the plight of the people touched his heart. He embarked upon the mammoth task of rehabilitating refugees in the area, and made significant progress. A premature death took Captain Cox in 1799 before he could finish his work. But the work he had done earned him a place in the hearts of the locals and to commemorate his role in rehabilitation work a market was established and named after him as Cox's Bazaar ("Cox's Market"). Reply to this

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