Blogs from Persepolis, South, Iran, Middle East

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Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis November 19th 2017

I was oddly anxious about visiting Persepolis. I wasn't sure what to expect in terms of whether it would be a disappointment - had Alexander made such a thorough demolition job in 330BC that there would be nothing worth seeing. In retrospect I needn't have worried, there is plenty to see and it is still an impressive place. Vahid walked us around the main elements of the site - I think we were lucky that it wasn't blazing sunshine at this exposed place. Whilst the buildings are fragmentary there are lots of marvellous reliefs to look at. We then had free time to explore further - Susan went for tea, I went to see the rock cut tombs in the hillside above the site. Going up the hill gave the opportunity to look down over the ... read more
Persepolis - Approaching the platform
Persepolis
The Gate of All Nations

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis March 5th 2017

Drink wine and look at the moon and think of all the civilizations the moon has seen passing by. - Omar Khayyam Our second day in Iran began a bit earlier, and we were picked up by our guide and his driver to make the journey outside the city to several ancient historical sights – particular highlights for Clement. We began at the Necropolis, the dynastic burial place of four Achaemenid kings, Darius II, Artaxerxes I, Darius I and Xerxes I (from left to right). There are bas-relief renderings of their palace facades carved above the tombs, and the openings lead to funerary chambers, where bones were stored after vultures had picked them clean. All the tombs had been ransacked by the Greeks – a common practice at the time for invading powers – but the ... read more
Necropolis
Necropolis
Necropolis

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis April 19th 2016

Shiraz is old and beautiful, with plenty of sandstone structures and historic monuments. About two million people live here. The hotel was situated in the old city, within a maze of sandstone alleyways that kind of reminded me of the old city of Jerusalem. We walked the streets on our own and explored the area before finding a local Iranian restaurant for a late dinner. The room was quaint and comfortable and we had tea at the rooftop cafe before enjoying a pleasant sleep. Karl and Rebecca were truly British and required tea breaks every few hours. I was happy to oblige. Karl was fiending alcohol, but since this was a dry Islamic country and we didn't know any locals, there would be no way of getting any here. Not that I'm drinking much at this ... read more
Necropolis
Nasir Ol Molk Mosque
Necropolis and Flag

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis September 26th 2015

Not many words or photos but Persepolis is historically significant enough to get it's own entry. We were lucky, our guides had arranged for one of the previous archaeologists to give us a tour. Not only was he knowledgeable but he was also an interesting, lively, rebellious old boy who had no hesitation in sharing with us his stories of wine drinking and hunting and eating wild boar. I guess when you get into your 80's you can afford to be a bit less cautious. The ruins themselves show how advanced the technologies of the ancient Persians were with running water, sewage treatment and precise construction methods. It was an amazing feeling to walk through such a historic place.... read more
Persepolis
Persepolis
Persepolis

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis May 3rd 2014

While Europeans were swinging from the trees and bashing each other with clubs, there was the Persian empire. At its height, it spanned India in the east to Bulgaria (just north of Greece for the geographically inept). It was huge, extremely cultured and civilized. The Persians were known for being benevolent invaders, choosing not to oppress and not to integrate, but rather respect and maintain cultural identity where possible. For those of you that are familiar with the biblical stories, King Darius (Daniel and the lions den), King Cyrus (the king who let Nehemiah rebuild Jerusalem's walls) and King Xerxes (the king in Esther), I'm sure you have noticed that the kings were benevolent. The Persians also perfected the postal system and were able to deliver mail from India to Europe in fifteen days (mail from ... read more
Persepolis
Melenie helps that lion take down the horse
Nashq-e Rostam - Necropolis near persepolis

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis October 7th 2012

Ancient Persepolis - the heart of ancient Persia - today’s Iran. Towering columns, massive gateways, monumental staircases and exquisite reliefs. Its almost impossible to imagine these ruins in their former splendor. And to imagine the proud empire that held the Greeks at bay for so very long. It started in the 7th century BC with Persepolis being constructed in the early 500 BCs. At its height, the Persian Empire stretched from India to Europe’s Danube River. It had the first postal system in the world with paved roads stretching from one end to the other to speed the mail on its way. The famed King Cyrus perhaps established the humane and inclusive policies that brought those conquered by the Persian Empire into the empire not as conquered, but as integral parts of the fabric that was ... read more
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Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis January 22nd 2011

shanbe Jan22Sat Up at the crack of dawn, even earlier, for a 5:00am full-day trip to Persepolis, Naqhsh-e Rostam and Naqhsh-e Rajab, before ending off with Passagardae, which according to LP is a questionable stop for what value there is to see at the site. Let's see! My driver, Ahmed Miere (a Shirazian with no English), arrives a little late and with only a slight detour to pick up his friend, who is along for the ride, we head off for less than an hour or so before getting to Persepolis. I am no history enthusiast, nor am I really particularly knowledgeable about Iranian times around 2 million B.C, but I understand that Persepolis, may be possibly the greatest empire of the Achaemenid period, and will be something to behold; this is what I have really ... read more
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Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis August 21st 2010

Persepolis lies about 40 km outside the city of Shiraz (origin of the wine grape). It’s an amazing archaeological site dating back to 512 BC. It takes some imagination to get a full appreciation for what the place used to look like because it was burned to the ground by Alexander of Macedonia and hasn’t had much reconstruction done since it was rediscovered in the 1930s. It was really neat to see, but we’d recommend visiting at a different time of year when it’s not so hot during the day.It was a bit tough with the group travel thing since it was mid-morning when we arrived at the site and it was already getting pretty hot. The lighting wasn’t very good for photos but our guide was really knowledgeable so we learned a lot about the ... read more
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Persepolis 10
Persepolis 2

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis April 27th 2009

Rano przyjechala po nas pani przewodnik i zabrala nas do starozytnego Persepolis. Jako tlo historyczne niech posluzy link: http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persepolis Dzis przy Persepolis jest wielki parking i smierdzace kible. I stosunkowo duzo turystow, na szczescie rowniez lokalnych. Sa tez pozostalosci miasteczka namiotowego, ktore pobudowal ostatni szach w 1971 i gdzie zorganizowal gigantyczna impreze - kolejna ekscentryczna zachcianke, ktora przyczynila sie do jego upadku. Gdy juz sie to wszystko minie i wejdzie sie po wielkich schodach na plaskowyz, na ktorym lezy miasto, ukazuja sie imponujace ruiny palacow - w Perspolis nikt nighy nie mieszkal, sluzylo tylko reprezentacji. kolumny i sciany wybudowane byly z kamieni wapiennych, laczonych olowianymi klamrami. Ozdobione rzezbami i plaskorzezbami, ktore opowiadaja historie dynastii. Dachy palacow byly z drewna i slomy, wiec gdy Aleks... read more
Aaaaa! Mowi samo za siebie.
Po poludniu Persepolis opustoszalo.
To zdjecie zrobila nam inna mala iranska dziewczynka.

Middle East » Iran » South » Persepolis March 17th 2009

I didn’t realise there was a hot shower in the hotel until the third morning… I was leaving for my next destination in an hour, it was winter and I didn’t want to get the towel wet whilst drying off. That’s a hard thing to achieve! So I wipe my body with my hand to minimise the water hitting the towel. Than tentatively wipe with the towel making sure I’m not sticking to the one area. After that I hang the towel up whilst packing my backpack. The reason for this is that if it is damp than the towel (now compressed in my backpack for hours) will smell till the next wash and wiping with a smelly towel makes a shower almost useless. What has that got to do with Persepolis? Nothing! Accept that that’s ... read more
Xerxes Gateway
Persepolis
Persepolis




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