In the Tongue of the Ocean


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Oceans and Seas » Caribbean
March 25th 2017
Published: May 26th 2022
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Andros IslandAndros IslandAndros Island

Andros Island, Bahamas. Traversing the Tongue of the Ocean. DSC_0577p1
Rough seas greeted our first day out. We were running though what is known as the "Tongue of the Ocean", the Bahamas passage between Andros Island to the west and New Providence, Exuma and Long Island to the east. It's called the Tongue because a deep sea trench makes a curled tongue-like formation between the islands. As seas were rough and the ship rolling, I guess the Tongue was giving us a licking! Andros Island was clearly visible to starboard. Later in the day and further along the passage, Rum Cay was visible to port.

Sunday evening was the first Formal Night. Dinner was Lobster Tail with a Fried Oysters appetizer. After dinner Susan and I enjoyed the Latin music ensemble in the Havana Bar. The ship's doctor joined them on bongos! (The quiet and laid back space aft was one of our favorite locations on the ship.)

Around 11:00 a.m. on the second day out, the Tiburon Peninsula of Haiti could be seen off the port side of the ship. The long Massif de la Hotte rising out of sea reminded one that Haiti is the most mountainous of the Caribbean islands. Seas were much calmer and glasslike
Rum CayRum CayRum Cay

Rum Cay, Bahamas. Traversing the Tongue of the Ocean. DSC_0588p1
in this part of the Caribbean.

At about the same time, Navassa Island appeared off the starboard side of the ship. Navassa is one of the more curious of the Caribbean islands. Thirty-five miles from Haiti, the small island has been claimed by the United States since 1857. It was once the site of an active guano mining industry but has been uninhabited for more than a century.

Dinner brought forth one of my cruise favorites: Beef Wellington.


Additional photos below
Photos: 10, Displayed: 10


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Rum CayRum Cay
Rum Cay

Rum Cay, Bahamas. Traversing the Tongue of the Ocean. DSC_0593p1
Duo MuranoDuo Murano
Duo Murano

Carnival Sunshine. Duo Murano Latin music ensemble in the Havana Bar. The ship's doctor joined them on bongos! IMG_0433p1
Tiburon PeninsulaTiburon Peninsula
Tiburon Peninsula

Off the Tiburon Peninsula of Haiti. DSC_0618p1
Massif de la HotteMassif de la Hotte
Massif de la Hotte

The long Massif de la Hotte rising out of sea reminded one that Haiti is the most mountainous of the Caribbean islands. DSC_0622p1
Navassa IslandNavassa Island
Navassa Island

Navassa Island. Navassa is one of the more curious of Caribbean islands. Thirty-five miles from Haiti, the small island has been claimed by the United States since 1857. It was once the site of an active guano mining industry but has been uninhabited for more than a century. It is administered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. DSC_0624p1
Carnival SunshineCarnival Sunshine
Carnival Sunshine

Carnival Sunshine at sea in the Caribbean. Mezzanine Deck. IMG_0450
Broiled Maine Lobster TailBroiled Maine Lobster Tail
Broiled Maine Lobster Tail

Carnival Sunshine. Broiled Maine Lobster Tail. Toasted orzo with shrimp, broccoli, citrus gremolata. Sunday Dinner. IMG_0421
Beef WellingtonBeef Wellington
Beef Wellington

Carnival Sunshine. Beef Wellington. Monday Dinner. IMG_0457


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