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Traveling, humanitarian crisis and ethic

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Travelling (and economically supporting) countries that are committing atrocities
12 years ago, April 10th 2007 No: 1 Msg: #12689  
Ok guys this is not a discussion on how we can help Darfur and all that stuff, there is other websites for that.

But I just came across this video: http://physiciansforhumanrights.org/sudan/darfur.html

This is in my opinion a vibrant and shocking testimony of the situation over there. Situations that is (and was) too common in many countries around the globe.

What I want to ask you is if you visited one of those countries (I know that Sudan is still a popular destination in its eastern side but it can also be any other countries with similar problems), how did you cope with the fact that you were there while things like that were happening and how ethical you think it is to travel in such countries?

I personally never traveled in such a country (although this can be argued) but I think it should be part of an ethical way to travel, in the same way some persons refuse to buy products from certain countries. Reply to this

9 years ago, January 11th 2010 No: 2 Msg: #99181  
Hi! Like your reflections!

It looks like I have to go there... but just thinking, and I could be wrong here.

Could it be that visting, comment and expose the problems there can help them?


It looks like the world forget, don read, and dont react on Sudan....


Bjorn
Reply to this

9 years ago, February 7th 2010 No: 3 Msg: #102798  
By that same ridiculous notion I suppose I should boycott the US. While the those in the US are more then happy to chastise those in the third world for poor human rights records they are unwilling to look closer to home. A million Iraqis have been killed in an illegal war as compared to 60,000 in Darfur. Reply to this

9 years ago, February 9th 2010 No: 4 Msg: #103093  
Hello Vincent 😊

I think boycotting can be a very useful form of peaceful protest, but vital to its success is that many people are involved. It also helps if media attention can be put on it.

As far as individuals avoiding certain countries because of personal objections to the politics and/or human rights situations is concerned, I dont think this is effective. I think, it would be more effective to make ourselves as politically aware as possible. Our presence does in a small way open peoples minds up to the concepts of better human rights standards, wealth, freedom... Those of us who come from certain countries are symbols of what this progress our countries have made looks like. ie We are real people, who can be related to.

Same with the products from these countries. Boycott, but be sure to try to get others involved and to get a as much attention as possible onto it.

Mel Reply to this

9 years ago, February 9th 2010 No: 5 Msg: #103094  

It looks like the world forget, don read, and dont react on Sudan....


Yeah, I think if we visit those places, the people there also become more real for us. We could even meet people we could call friends, and see that what is happening to them is as serious as if it happened to any of our friends.
Reply to this

9 years ago, February 9th 2010 No: 6 Msg: #103095  

By that same ridiculous notion I suppose I should boycott the US. While the those in the US are more then happy to chastise those in the third world for poor human rights records they are unwilling to look closer to home. A million Iraqis have been killed in an illegal war as compared to 60,000 in Darfur.


Is it useful at all to compare who is worse than who, when there are real people suffering unbearable situations? Deciding whether Dafur or the US is the worst will not help people at all, in my opinion. And worse still, if we focus on blaming, it will take us further away from caring enough to consider what we can do to help those who are suffering. When people start considering if boycotting or anything else they could do will help, I think this in fact a positive sign for humanity. Reply to this

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