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Humidity and Cameras

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Any Experience with cameras in the jungle heat
12 years ago, July 17th 2009 No: 1 Msg: #79942  
Hi
Has any one taken a SLR into the jungle and had issues with the humidity misting things up - causing any long or short term issues? Any ideas on how to stop / help the situation??
Thanks Reply to this

12 years ago, July 17th 2009 No: 2 Msg: #79976  
Humidity will definitely cause your camera lenses to fog up. From what I've read and experienced, the best thing you can do is give your camera an hour or more to adjust when going from cool to warm places. Once you go back inside and let the camera air out so that water doesn't get inside the camera.

If too much moisture gets into the camera and stays there you could have a problem with mold. Mold can do tons of damage to a camera if not dealt with immediately.

I never had any major problems in places like Laos, Vietnam, Thailand, etc. If you let the moisture that condenses on the lens evaporate before taking pictures, you're good to go. Just make sure you don't leave moisture in the camera when the day of shooting is done.

As always the best advice is be careful and pay attention to your equipment!

Mike T. Reply to this

12 years ago, July 17th 2009 No: 3 Msg: #79981  
B Posts: 137
You need not even go as far as into the jungle. Cruising in and out of aircon environments in your typical Asian megacity can have the same effect on glasses and lenses (Hong Kong aircon buses are quite nasty this time of year).

About two weeks ago I also had an incident where the autofocus got temporarily knocked out. My Canon Ultrasonic F1.4 lens went completely stone dead and I thought it had broken down since my Tamron lenses operated normally, but after being indoors for some time it came back to life. I suspect it may have been caused by humidity as well. Reply to this

12 years ago, July 19th 2009 No: 4 Msg: #80083  
B Posts: 5
I traveled to the tambopata jungle in Peru and didn't have and problems with my Canon digital rebel xti. I purchased some desicants to put in my camera bag. The desicants took care of the humidity and I was able to take great photo's.
Reply to this

12 years ago, July 20th 2009 No: 5 Msg: #80273  
That's a great idea Carol..I should look into that one!

Mike T. Reply to this

12 years ago, July 20th 2009 No: 6 Msg: #80274  
Thanks - Desicants are now on the 'To Get' list!

Great shots on the website Mike - v inspirational, hope that venture works out for you.
Pete Reply to this

12 years ago, July 20th 2009 No: 7 Msg: #80305  
B Posts: 5
I purchased mine off of ebay. There will be a strip that comes with them to let you know how much humidity there is and when you should change our the desicant. Good Luck! Reply to this

12 years ago, July 20th 2009 No: 8 Msg: #80306  
B Posts: 5
I purchased mine off of ebay. There will be a strip that comes with them to let you know how much humidity there is and when you should change our the desicant. Good Luck! Reply to this

12 years ago, July 20th 2009 No: 9 Msg: #80307  
B Posts: 5
I purchased mine off of ebay. There will be a strip that comes with them to let you know how much humidity there is and when you should change our the desicant. Good Luck! Reply to this

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