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Fort Denison-Sydney Harbour  
   

Fort Denison-Sydney Harbour

One of the most popular islands in Sydney Harbour is Fort Denison, sometimes known as ‘Pinchgut’ or ‘Rock Island’. The island has a fascinating convict past, being originally used as a place of punishment for the more difficult convicts. It was the convicts who named it ‘Pinchgut’ after the starvation rations they had to face. In 1788 a convict named Thomas Hill was sentenced to a week on bread and water in irons on what was then referred to as ‘the small white rocky Island adjacent to this Cove’. By 1796 a gibbet was constructed and convicts who were sentenced to death were left to hang until their bones turned white. The most famous convict to be sentenced to death here is Francis Morgan, who arrived in the colony in 1793 on the Sugar Cane from Ireland. He had been tried for the murder of a man at Glassneven in Co Dublin, and was caught wearing the murdered man’s watch. Convicted, his sentence was commuted to transportation for life. After his arrival in Sydney, he was again charged with murder, after bashing a man named Simon Raven to death on the north side of the harbour on 18 October 1796. By the 1840s the colony, fearing invasion from the Russians, had converted the island into a fort and by 1857 the fort was manned, including two ten inch guns and twelve 32 pounders. The guns have only been fired during ceremonies and on special occasions.
Reptiles, Views, Belly Dancing, USA

September 8th 2011
Tuesday, 16 August 2011 Wow what a feeling to be back in Australia. Home for Francine and now since Angie is an honorary Aussie, a home away from home. At least here we can walk safely in the street and enjoy our freedom that the Austrailian ( & Allied Forces) fought so hard in New Guinea and elsewhere to perserve. We will always carry with us, a better understanding of what it took to have ... read more
Oceania » Australia » New South Wales » Gosford

Australian Flag Aboriginal settlers arrived on the continent from Southeast Asia about 40,000 years before the first Europeans began exploration in the 17th century. No formal territorial claims were made until 1770, when Capt. James COOK took possession in the name... ... read more
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