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The village Mao.  
   

The village Mao.

The village Mao is probably the furthest off the beaten track I've been, since no tourist had ever been there before. The only way to get there is on a two-wheeler (or by foot) since one has to cross several rivers riding on rotten planks (which excludes heavy motorbikes as well). All the villagers use bicycles to cross the overgrown cattletracks that lead to and from Mao some 20km from the mainroad. The turnoff is unmarked so one need to ask the locals for directions. Of course we had to talk to the village chief as we arrived and ask for permission to camp, and the whole village was in turmoil as they saw us. He explained that the last Muzungus that had been in the village was the Germans. Oh, Overlanders, I thought. No, he explained. The Germans had passed through the village while building a telephone-line to Kasanga, during his grandfathers rule, before the first world war. The village had also survived the impact of Western missionaries, Peace Corps or other volunteers, which is a novelty in Africa these days.
The Wild West

November 30th 2007
The road was long and beautiful. It winded over gently undulating semi-savannah, across the Fipa-plateau, past small friendly villages and through deep and damp forest. Wouldn’t it have been for a twist of fate we would never have discovered that exceptional stretch of bad gravel and instead we would have been chugging up Lake Tanganyika on the legendary steamer MV Liemba. The steamboat had bee ... read more
Africa » Tanzania » West » Kigoma

Tanzanian Flag Shortly after independence, Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to form the nation of Tanzania in 1964. One-party rule came to an end in 1995 with the first democratic elections held in the country since the 1970s. Zanzibar's semi-autonomous status and po... ... read more
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