Blogs from Antarctica, Antarctica

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Antarctica » Antarctica March 21st 2014

Farewell to Antarctica You have to allow time for Antarctica to speak to you! It really is a special place. This trip to the Antarctic was the last of the season, winter is setting in fast, the sea is beginning to refreeze again, the days are shortening and the cold is gripping the continent. I will continue to reflect on these Antarctic voyages for quite some time, they have been more mind-blowing than I could have imagined. The sheer scale of things, the awe-inspiring beauty and the immensity of it all is staggering. I am blessed to have spent more time down here than I ever would have thought, and just to top things off, this last trip had some spectacular highlights! The Iceberg Graveyard Looking down onto the grounded icebergs in Pleneau Bay from a ... read more
Penguins at Port Charcot
Booth Island
Booth Island

Antarctica » Antarctica March 19th 2014

Hiya folks! Theresa, here. I wanted to share with you, this video that our lovely friends, Doug and Robin had put together for the Antarctica Expedition that I was on. I think they have done an amazing job in capturing our expedition. I had tears in my eyes watching it as it brought back that feeling in my heart again. Thanks, Doug and Robin! Enjoy this wonderful visual journal and if you ever get the chance to see Antarctica first hand, do it. Hasta luego Theresa p.s. you will have to copy and paste it to your browser-- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEIVZEzhVLk... read more


The experience of Antarctica is not an easy thing to describe. So let me say at the outset I don´t think this is going to do it justice. The experience is so overwhelming that I feel I will need at least until the end of this trip to make sense and find an appropriate context for it all. It goes without saying that Antarctica is a place like no other - where else can you go where the landscape is so pristine with little or no evidence of man's footprint, where everything from weather to glaciers to mountains is on an epic scale. Antarctica defies comparison. Time will tell if this is the most memorable place I have visited. What is beyond question is that it was very, very special, an experience bordering on the spiritual. ... read more
King Penguins at Fortuna Bay, South Georgia
Stromness Whaling Station South Georgia
Grytviken Whaling Station South Georgia

Antarctica » Antarctica March 11th 2014

SQUAWK! I have become rather fond of penguins! Visiting much of the same colonies over the past few months, I have seen the penguins build their nests out of pebbles and watched as they laid their first egg. I have sat on the shores of distant beaches and perched myself high upon rocks and watched the penguins cherish and care for their eggs… I’ve witnessed new life as the chicks emerge from their shells as they hatch. I’ve seen the devotion and determination of penguin parents as they battle against the elements to feed and raise these chicks to adults, feeding them with regurgitated krill and fish. I’ve seen them swimming and hunting in the icy water. They swam under my boat and right up to the beach where I sat… I’ve witnessed that grand transformation ... read more
Colonies
About to Feed her Chick
Feeding her Chick Regurgitated Krill

Antarctica » Antarctica March 2nd 2014

Meanwhile in the South... In Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s epic poem ‘Rime of the Ancient Mariner’, an albatross starts to a follow a ship. Back in the days of sail, being followed by an albatross was generally considered as good luck. However, the mariner in the aforementioned poem gets out his crossbow and kills the albatross, which is regarded as a dreadful act that would send a curse upon the ship – a curse of windless days, disease, hunger and thirst (In the poem, the ship and crew do indeed suffer terrible misfortune.) To punish him, his shipmates force the mariner to wear the dead albatross around his neck, seemingly forever - until they all eventually die from the curse. The albatross can be both an omen of good luck or bad luck. ‘Ah! Well a-day! What ... read more
2) My GPS
3) Neptune and the Queen
4) Kissing Neptune's Blue Toe

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Antarctica » Antarctica February 26th 2014

Thanks for following my Antarctic Experience, everyone! This is the last of the photos I´ll be posting of it. I miss it already! Stay tuned for more of my travels, as I bounce around the country of Argentina! Time for some summer as I move northbound to the hotter temps! Dave continues his Antarctic journey for a little while longer on the Sea Spirit then we meet up and may have yet another interesting country to share with you...? We shall see! Stay tuned! Hasta luego! Theresa... read more
Close to the ship
Beauty!
Sunrise

Antarctica » Antarctica February 24th 2014

Here are more photos that have spilled over to yet another blog entry from my epic journey through Antarctica. Just so you know, I took about 2000 photos in total on my expedition. So to narrow them down to about 140 photos, was not an easy task. When there were so many photo-ops with the wildlife and landscape, it is a rather difficult undertaking to edit to the best ones to tell my story, and to not bore you with so many penguin pics! The Museum in Port Lockroy was most amusing as you will see with the photos. Thanks for all the great comments by the way, just so you all know, we are reading them and we love getting them! Enjoy! Theresa... read more
Port Lockroy Museum
Recipe in Port Lockroy Museum
Recipe in Port Lockroy Museum

Antarctica » Antarctica February 23rd 2014

If you find yourself asking the same question to yourself which is: why go to such a cold, damp, icy place when there are warm places to go? Why go there when Canada (and other Northern Hemisphere areas) have enough snow and ice to make you crazy especially during the long drawn out wintery spring that we sometimes can get, and that last snow fall in June just to remind us that we live in the north? I went to Antarctica with no expectations. I knew the wildlife was going to be amazing. But what I did not realize that I was to learn about the most preserved, most prestine place on the planet. Where mountains are still being carved by hundreds of glaciers, where volcanoes are still reshaping the landscape. Where scientific study is still ... read more
Humbacks Side feeding
At least 4 Humpbacks in this shot
Humpback with the landscape

Antarctica » Antarctica February 19th 2014

Some words that have inspired me, during my reflection of such an enormously moving journey in Antarctica... This quote was from the book, Southern Horizons, The History of the British Antarctic Territory, by Robert Burton (copywrite 2008), and it is originally from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (one of Dave´s favourite poems): And now there came both mist and snow, And it grew wondrous cold: And ice, mast-high, came floating by. As green as emerald Just to change the mood a bit, and in keeping with the poetic theme, part of our life on the Sea Spirit was to participate in competitions when we had a spare moment between gourmet meals, and getting our parkas on for zodiac landings. One of these competitions was created by Dave. Yup, you guessed it. A poetry ... read more
Cape Petrel
The Guvernoren
Antarctic Tern

Antarctica » Antarctica February 17th 2014

Finding the right words to describe what I have seen and experienced in the Antarctic will be difficult with our limited spoken language from our left brain. Perhaps, the best way would be to beam over to you, a vision from my heart what it really means and feels like, to be with the Albatross as its gargantuous wings sail over the waves of the Drake Passage, what it means to see my first mountain adorned by glaciers, feeding their ice tongues into the sea, what it means to be in a place of such extreme, rugged, prestine, natural and untouched beauty. As soon as the first mountain met my gaze, as the ship moved closer and closer to our first destination of exploration, my spirit said, ¨You have arrived now. It is okay to open ... read more
Chinstrap Penguins
March of a Chinstrap
Juvenille Chinstrap Penguin




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