Travelling in Turkey from Kemer to the Bosphorus


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Middle East » Turkey » Marmara » Istanbul
July 5th 2009
Published: July 14th 2009EDIT THIS ENTRY

Turkey... how can we give you an idea of this diverse and fascinating country?

NUMBER ONE:

Turks smile broadly when they find out we are Aussies and then tell you about their aunty in Sydney, uncle in Melbourne or girlfriend in Canberra - that's before they try to sell you something!! But they do it so nicely....

PRECONCEIVED IDEAS:

The little we have seen has been amazing and we keep learning new things as we go. For instance, we always thought it a dry country, but Turkey exports lots of water to arid neighbours and in the south we got used to seeing standpipes near roads pouring water all day and night - to release the pressure apparently. Closer to Istanbul we saw many green and verdant fields with fat cows and goats. As drought conditions tighten in Israel, Jordan, Lebanon etc they are talking about a water based solution in the Middle East where water not land is the negotiating point and Turkey would be at the centre of such talks.

ANTIQUITY ISN'T JUST A PICTURE IN A BOOK HERE.

Ruins are often just lying beside the roads and bays. At Phaselis near Kemer
The view in KemerThe view in KemerThe view in Kemer

These rocks were the first thing we saw from our window the morning after arriving in the dark late the night before.
where an ancient Lycian seaport existed we wandered through the remains past the baths and the theatre and houses (where Alexander the Great visited and where the main avenue was named after Hadrian) and then swam in the Roman harbour bays with the remains of Roman stone steps and bathing areas! In Dalyian, ancient (3rd millenium BC) tombs were cut into the rock of the hills opposite our house and we could see them when we woke each morning. (The rock was carved to resemble the wooden dwellings they were so proud of). We sailed into a bay full of ruins on a cruise to find that it was used by ancient seafarers as a boat repair shop. All this was before we walked into the amphitheatres and climbed up through the restoration work being done on Roman houses at Ephesus and visited the magnificent Acropolis at Pergamon.

At Ephesus we saw the Bascilica of St John where he came after the persecution of the disciples. It is believed that he brought Mary with him to protect her. Her house on a nearby hill has been turned into a shrine.

THINGS CAN GET CONFUSING WHEN YOU DON'T SPEAK
Cable car near KemerCable car near KemerCable car near Kemer

From the bottom we were off to the very top. It is the longest in the word - 2.6 kms up and 4 kms long with only 4 pylons -- scary stuff.
THE LANGUAGE!

One ruin we missed seeing was Aspendos when we thought we were going to see Carmina Burana (a ballet version) in a summer Festival at the ancient ampitheatre. Unfortunately, due to a misunderstanding, our Turkish friends got us tickets to the new Aspendos theatre (adjacent to the old) where we saw a Turkish version of Riverdance!

LIVING IN A NEW COUNTRY:

Fresh fruit and vegetables are cheap, full of flavour and plentiful and the yoghurt is delicious. We have had great lamb and fish dishes and a highlight was a selection of vegetarian mezze dishes in a little river side restaurant in Dalyan. Pide, eggplant dishes, pizza, cherries, figs, peaches, yoghurt or mint drinks and long breakfasts are the order of the day against a backdrop of the sound of spoons as they are used to stir the sugar in Turkish tea (cay).

The temperature has hovered in the mid 30's but the sea was warm and inviting. Day trip cruises were cheap and plentiful - around $35 each for a full day trip where they pick you up by mini bus at 9am, take you out sailing around islands and bays, provide lunch
Our host's new carOur host's new carOur host's new car

Colin (another one) loves old Yank tanks. The main problem was that he was unsure if he could get it up the narrow tracks to his house!
and drop you back outside your door at 6pm or so. We can understand why so many people from colder climates holiday, live (or want to live) in Turkey.

We enjoyed two varied and fantastic homestays. The first at Kemer and then at Dalyan before we began the long drive to Istanbul. In 4 nights on the road we stayed at a small old hotel near Ephesus, a holiday hotel with a pool on the beach at Kisili for 2 nights ($115 for dinner, bed and breakfast ) and then in a cabin in an isolated beachside caravan park for $40 for bed and breakfast! At the last one we seemed to be the only foreigners around as it is a Turkish family holiday spot we'd been told about. We were asked- "How did you find it?" We didn't say that good Aussie commonsense told us that, after one of the hottest summer days this year which we spent being fried at Gallipoli, we were determined to find water before the day ended!

Everybody we have met has been gracious and helpful, apologising to us for not having much English as we felt embarressed at our lack of Turkish. Driving over 1500 km, about 500 on expressways and divided roads and the rest on everthing from roads like that south of Nowra to goat tracks, we survived tractors, donkey carts, overloaded and unstable trucks. Sometimes we had them coming towards us on our side (forwards or backwards), going round roundabouts the wrong way and ignoring red lights. Many of these skills Colin has mastered and when he gets back into an automatic on the left of the road, watch out.

GALLIPOLI

Those who have been there will understand how frustrated and helpless you feel as you look at the impossible terrain and try to picture what it must have been like in 1915. If only - we said that a dozen times- and I heard guides saying it as well. If only they had landed a bit further up the coast or if only they hadn't been left from April to January the next year. As at any war scene the futility of the whole thing is overwhelming. The Turkish revere Attaturk and he said in a message to mothers from all countries who lost sons on Turkish soil "Having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well"

One welcome sight for us in the many war memorials that dot the landscape is at Lone Pine - the Australian memorial. To see something living and green silhouetted against the sky was somehow a comfort and bought a human scale to the whole place.

REACHING ISTANBUL

It was a relief to hand in the car at the airport in Istanbul and complete our journey to our third homestay by bus (particularly when the five lanes of traffic converged into 3 to go through a Roman aquaduct). We are in Taksim, in a beautiful apartment with a lovely courtyard. The weather has been kind and we are able to get across to the older areas using the funicular, or the nostalgic tram and "the tunnel", Europe's second oldest underground, and the fast light rail.

Oh by the way ...we bought a Turkish carpet!!!




Additional photos below
Photos: 46, Displayed: 26


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Dinner outDinner out
Dinner out

This was when we still thought we were off to the ballet!
This is where we ended upThis is where we ended up
This is where we ended up

See the resemblance to Michael Flatley?
Try sorting out this bus jam.Try sorting out this bus jam.
Try sorting out this bus jam.

Imagine if you'd parked your car like this poor person had and you came out of the theatre to see it surrounded by buses...
Up a gorge near KemerUp a gorge near Kemer
Up a gorge near Kemer

This restaurant gets washed away every spring!
Going to the beach Dalyan styleGoing to the beach Dalyan style
Going to the beach Dalyan style

Riverboats take 40 minutes to ferry you downstream to the sand spit to the beach.
The beach at Dalyan The beach at Dalyan
The beach at Dalyan

Its like Sandbar- a long sandspit separates the ocean and the lake
Col and Joanne Col and Joanne
Col and Joanne

We went on 12 Island cruise for the day
most of the day was spent like thismost of the day was spent like this
most of the day was spent like this

Regular stops were made so that you could swim off the boat
The icecream van!The icecream van!
The icecream van!

Even off shore they manage to find you.
Beach protectionBeach protection
Beach protection

That ain't Bondi sand Col's standing on so shoes were a necessity.
Mud bathsMud baths
Mud baths

Yuk but this little girl seemed to enjoy it


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