Blogs from Cap Skirring, Lower Casamance, Senegal, Africa

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Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring June 24th 2012

We set out across no-man’s land with certain sense trepidation. The three kilometre stretch of unpaved road between the two respective countries customs posts was heavily mined during the 70s as part of the on going conflict over the Western Sahara. The twisted remains of various shattered vehicles offered a sharp reminder as to what happens if you strayed off the marked path. In the distance we saw the cluster of windswept buildings that represented the Mauritanian border. As expected the place was chaos, money changers, taxi drivers, truckers and border police were all vying for business. The Mauritanian Gendarmerie had the swagger and look of uniformed thugs and you could see their eyes light up when they saw our vehicle. We had back on the Moroccan border decided to employ the services of a ‘helper’ ... read more
Mauritania
St Louis
St Louis

Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring April 12th 2011

It was a battle of wills during a stroll along the beach in Cap Skirring. Renowned for its people-less beaches those few people that are there are there to talk and talk up a storm. They are the beach bums. The Rasta men, a group of people I have very little time for. So when I set off left from my accommodation on the water for $12 a night I was heading the opposite direction of town and towards the Guinea-Bissau border. I wouldn’t get robed or beaten up but would instead test the Rasta mans will power. How far will this guy walk with me? Will he stay with me long enough for me to turn back? I re-entered Senegal from The Gambia and started off with a pee next to the immigration office. Not ... read more
2 - What you want to see at a beach
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Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring March 17th 2011

Dear Family and Friends 18 So i left you all in a stoned haze in Casamance. Unlike Gambia, we did not feel the need to make like a tampon; yet the sole activity of smoking as much dope as possible was quickly losing its flavor on the third day. We decided to get make like Tom and Cruise. Our next destination was Cap Skirring, the tourist mecca of Casamance. We were a little hesitant about Cap Skirring as the last African tourist mecca was a bloody hole that we barely escaped from with our wallets intact. Yet on the assurance of many locals and other travellers we decided to overcome our aversion and give it a chance by staying the night. So I believe Kololi wanted to be like Cap Skirring, but through politics, over development ... read more
Strolling
Almost sunset
Almost no one on the beach

Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring June 20th 2009

I visited another town today to see a fetish “Animist” traditional spirit tree. Although the town was only 10 KM down the road the people spoke a different dialect, which Simon said he couldn’t understand. It’s a very hot and nice day on the beach. The kids in the village I’m staying in seem to like me (I gave them saluting lessons). They get along well, although they’re both Muslim and Christian. Cute kids. Off to The Gambia tomorrow, hopefully to get some English books! Just finished “Sailing from Byzantium” and only have “The Miracle of the Rose” left, which is bizarre to say the least. ... read more

Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring June 19th 2009

So these couple days on the beach are turning out quite nicely, as the beach is beautiful and deserted. Plus mango season is on! This means I can have my fill of mangoes, while trying not to get hit by them as they fall from the trees! Babaka’s friend, Simon is very helpful and has shown me all around and introduced me to many of his friends and “family”. I can’t seen to avoid eating five meals a day as everyone is so hospitable. They are also mostly Christians, which means pigs running around and booze sold more readily, although the Senegalese seem to be the laisser faire Muslims (as Al would say). I’m actually staying in Babaka’s place in Kabrosse, which is where he lives when he works here during the tourist season. His hut ... read more

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Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring November 8th 2008

I am writing this blog early Friday night and have no plans to go out tonight. Most of my weekend nights have been on the very quiet side and me not being bothered by this in the least bit. I think I needed a break from the social life of going out in Chicago. Ok, it has been a probably about 12 days since my last update and time to finish writing about my time in Senegal. I left the remote island of Karabane and made the short trip to the villiage of Cap Skirring, which is the most touristy part of Casamance. I was worried I would find this place too touristy for my tastes as I heard there was a Club Med there right in the villiage. I took a taxi about a mile ... read more

Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring July 26th 2008

and from there we hired a pirogue to a town composed of 4 or 5 families, one of which, called djen-dollar (cause they were "rich"), had a hostel. in two days I knew the whole tow, it was as quiet as it gets, the stars where everywhere and the river would show r sink the towns tiny beach... I mean, you have should see it. really though. I will go back there one day and stay for a month cause it was beyond anything I expected to see in casamance. people were very kind, invted me to eat at their houses, or sleep there if I wanted, and I think localsd ended up liking me. I wasnt particularly smiley or nice to them, rather casual as always and I guess they liked that more than an ... read more
look
sleeping :)
gates of town

Africa » Senegal » Lower Casamance » Cap Skirring March 23rd 2008

Yoff was a little disappointing for us, the beach was filthy and we were constantly hassled to sit in people's shade compounds on the beach. We left after one day and decided to pick up our passports with our Malian visas and head straight to Ile de Goree, south of Dakar. Ile de Goree is a short 20 minute ferry from Dakar and is a world away from the big city. It is a tiny island that can be walked end to end in less than hour, at a stroll. There are no cars on the island (yay!) which is a delightful change. We arrived in the early afternoon and just after we checked in, Peter started feeling ill. Peter doesn't get ill very often, so this was very unusual, and I knew quite bad. We ... read more
Street in Ile de Gorée
House of Slaves
House of Slaves Museum




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