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Food Quiz

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Do you have what it takes to snatch the 'Food Meister' title? (Warning: this game may cause a period of procrastination!)
10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 81 Msg: #132597  
Nope, nope, nope! Not feijoa, green papaya, not a type of gourd. Not canarium. As I said, deceptive in its apparently simplicity. 😊

If you'd like a hint, perhaps I might suggest to think about the regions in which I've done the most of my travels, yes? Reply to this

10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 82 Msg: #132598  
B Posts: 580
That's not a clue That's an outrage! Reply to this

10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 83 Msg: #132641  
Indeed! If referring to the fact that I haven't blogged from much of anywhere (geo-politically speaking. N. America is, of course, very large and ecologically diverse). However, hard to take a photo of a fresh-picked fruit if it doesn't grow in a region you've been (or, okay, blogged about. Since I've been other places - but does my experience 'count' if I haven't documented it publicly? Ball to you on that one, ye who studies tourists 😊)
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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 84 Msg: #132653  
B Posts: 580
The outrage was directed at the sparsity of the clue - for as you state yourself - "N. America is, of course, very large and ecologically diverse" whole-lotta clue that is, I thought!

I thought wrong; that bit of trash talk saw you drop another vital clue "hard to take a photo of a fresh-picked fruit if it doesn't grow in a region you've been..."

"He's trash-talking the champ!", "she's dropped her guard", "he unleashes the southpaw-paw" The what?

PAWPAW!!!!

😱
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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 85 Msg: #132660  
Yes!! 😱 A most delicious and relatively unknown subtropical fruit that grows primarily around the Kentucky/Indiana region. Well done.

Naturally I knew I dropped that hint - what, you think I'd blame my lack of morning coffee for making me unaware I was directing you to a source indicating that I had lived in its limited geographic area? Never!!

Alright - who's up next?
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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 86 Msg: #132665  
B Posts: 580
Okay,

Since it is still April Fools' Day in some parts of the world. I do have carte blanche to post something ridiculously unguessable, but that wouldn't be fair or befitting the prestige of the title.

So instead, I'm going easy-peasy with this one 😱

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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 87 Msg: #132671  
I was supposed to say "That's easy!" but then I realized you made it so. 😊

Theobroma cacao


I thought wrong; that bit of trash talk saw you drop another vital clue "hard to take a photo of a fresh-picked fruit if it doesn't grow in a region you've been..."

"He's trash-talking the champ!", "she's dropped her guard", "he unleashes the southpaw-paw" The what?

PAWPAW!!!!



hilarious!



Stephanie, what if no one guesses it correctly? I'm giving up. What is it?
(Well, unless Jason wants to fight on.)



Reply to this

10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 88 Msg: #132678  
B Posts: 151

Nope, nope, nope! Not feijoa, green papaya, not a type of gourd. Not canarium.



If the answer is PAWPAW then I was right 😄.

PAPAYA is the same as PAWPAW.

Sorry Stephanie, I'm afraid you gonna have to eat your words 😉 .



P.S. It is derived from a Spanish name - papaya , though it's also called pawpaw here in Australia.
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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 89 Msg: #132680  
B Posts: 580
Oooohhh I'm not sure I like this attempt to sully my title...😞

I'll let Stephanie deal with this issue.

Else we may need to take it to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague.
Reply to this

10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 90 Msg: #132681  
B Posts: 151
Ok Jason, since I'm a giving person, I'll let you run away with my title 😉 ... to keep your track record !

Case Closed !

I actually wrote "papaya or pawpaw" in my initial answer but edited it because I thought they are the same (... and replaced pawpaw with "gourd" to broaden my chances).
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10 years ago, April 1st 2011 No: 91 Msg: #132686  
B Posts: 580

" replaced pawpaw with "gourd" to broaden my chances



Aesop's Fable,

If a dog swims across a river carrying a piece of meat or anything of that sort in its mouth, and sees its shadow, it opens its mouth and in hastening to seize the other piece of meat, it loses the one it was carrying



'Who all coveteth, oft he loseth all.'

😱
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10 years ago, April 2nd 2011 No: 92 Msg: #132696  
Johanna - Hmm.... I initially thought you had a valid argument, thinking that papaya was the Australian term for pawpaw. Except when I look up Australian recipes for pawpaw, I get pictures that show papaya Carica papaya, which the mystery fruit is not. So it appears that pawpaw is an Aussie term for papaya, and not in fact referencing the American pawpaw Asimina triloba which is an entirely different fruit. Just one example of the reasons international communities of scientists stick to S.I and Latin terms when it really matters to avoid costly mistakes.

So... as much I am simply loathe to do it, the title winner for my round stays with Jason. Alas. 😉

And in conclusion:

Papaya = the same thing in both Australia and the U.S. (and the U.K I imagine. Yes?)
Pawpaw = different things depending on which English dialect you are speaking
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10 years ago, April 7th 2011 No: 93 Msg: #133182  
What? I've been gone for almost a week and there are still no new developments?

Thanks, Jason, for giving me a heads up that I am the reigning Food Meister. 😊)

I remembered you guys and this "contest" when I saw this fruit. It was also my first time to see and taste it so I'm giving you many pictures to help you wrestle the title from me.





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10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 94 Msg: #133221  

10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 95 Msg: #133229  
Looks like one externally but the pulp of a fig is different from this one.

So, No. Try again. c",)


Clue: small fruits, about 4-6 cm, sour when unripe, sweet-sour when ripe, and related to a relatively better known fruit that's purplish in color Reply to this

10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 96 Msg: #133232  
B Posts: 11.5K
Is the relative passionfruit? Yep, I'm guessing here :-) Reply to this

10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 97 Msg: #133264  
Is it mamoncillo? (Or Meliccocus bijugatus - otherwise known in NYC as either canepas or genip because of the large Puerto Rican and Dominican populations)
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10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 98 Msg: #133284  
Nope, it's not mamoncillo.

The relative is not passion fruit but another purple fruit that's found in tropical areas, primarily Southeast Asia, and is much larger at 6-8 cm. (To save you the trouble, it's not star apple.)



Hmmm...on hindsight, I would also find it difficult to guess.

So, to be fair, I'd be more than happy to yield to anyone who is able to guess the family (genus) where this fruit belongs to, or even just its purple kin.
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10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 99 Msg: #133286  
Hmm... is it a relative of the mangosteen? Genus Garcinia? Reply to this

10 years ago, April 8th 2011 No: 100 Msg: #133287  
Great guess! Even got the genus right. 😊

Ok, again, I thought it is hard to figure out.

It's commonly known as kandis or binucao (Garcinia binucao). I initially thought it's the same as yellow mangosteen but as it turns out, it's a different species from the same genus.


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