On The Road to Moray and Cusco


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South America » Peru » Cusco » Moray
February 25th 2009
Published: February 26th 2009
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TravelingTravelingTraveling

I am back in motion. So were a lot of people in the countryside of Cusco region
"..on the road again..." I can hear Willie´s twang in my head as I drive up the mountain and over tabletop fields of corn and potatoes. I am in an old car with a driver who knows all the back roads. We nearly get stuck in mud twice, but his zippy sense of direction cuts off a few kilometres I suspect.
With great sadness I left Ollantaytambo and headed for the Inca site, Moray. I left the rain in the mountains for the first part of the day. We drove past Urubamba and turned right, over the river and up the mountain. Once we hit the tableland the sky was a perfect blue with cumulus clouds signaling rain sometime that day. The open sky was a nice change from the mountains; don´t get me wrong, I love them both for different reasons.
We passed through the village of Maras where the houses were made of clay and straw bricks. This looked like a poor village, and the sign on the clinic seemed to confirm that all was not well. Huge letters spelling out Hepititas B, and I hope it was an add for people to come and get a vaccine. I
Bye, RainBye, RainBye, Rain

The rain stayed in the mountains while we visited Moray.
have noticed that physical labour is the primary method to move goods or dig ditches or farm. Although I did see one tractor and plow, I suspect that only very large farms can afford this kind of machinery. Just before we got to Moray I saw two men with large cannisters of spray dusting the plants. I wonder how much agri-business has control of farming in this country? If big businesses own most of the cropland, poverty in the villages would be increased.
Most of the farmland, that I have seen in this area, is used for crops. Animals are tied in small patches of grass, such as marginal land between railroad and road, or house and highway. I wonder who owns most of the land? Often I see people bring grass to the tied animals. (e.g. first photo) Do farmers collectively own the field of grain and share the feed for their animals? or do the small farmers have to buy the grass and grain for their cattle? On the tabletop land there was some communal pasture, it seemed, but the grass was very short.
When we got to Moray, I descended into the first circle of terraced land.
BurrowsBurrowsBurrows

Animals were on the move, too. Being shifted from one ditch or field to the other. We saw donkeys, cattle, pigs and sheep, but no Llamas
If I had known there was a second and third, I would have hurried. I´d like to return to this site and spend more time exploring the circles.
The drive back to Cusco got more depressing as we approached the city limits. Rain was sprinkling when I got to the hotel. By night heavy rains were falling. I have got to plan the next few weeks of this trip.


Additional photos below
Photos: 43, Displayed: 23


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Bye, UrubambaBye, Urubamba
Bye, Urubamba

We climbed the switchback road across the river from the town
MarasMaras
Maras

We drove through village of Maras
Hep BHep B
Hep B

This was a poor village. I saw a huge sign on the clinic, "Hepitatis B". Hope they are providing vaccines for the children there.
ClayClay
Clay

Notice the buildings are made of clay bricks
NarrowNarrow
Narrow

As we got closer, the road got rougher and the animals and farmers increased
SpraySpray
Spray

These guys had cannisters of spray on their backs. Yuck, what needed poisoning this time of year?
SkySky
Sky

The beauty of land and sky was amazing. Peru is a vast and varied country.
Got thereGot there
Got there

When we got to Moray I passed my tourist ticket to the gatesperson and we parked the car.
WowWow
Wow

Look at what those Inca´s created this time!
View back upView back up
View back up

Halfway down to inner circle
Unique StairsUnique Stairs
Unique Stairs

They put long slabs of stone in the walls, to create stairs down each wall
GapGap
Gap

There was a two to three feet gap between each stepping stone. I thought they had short legs back then?
My footMy foot
My foot

All the way down you can´t help but think "this is going to be a bitch to come back up"
Taller Than MeTaller Than Me
Taller Than Me

Some of the walls were taller than me, and had four to five stone steps
VisitersVisiters
Visiters

If they can do it, so can I.... puff, puff
Going DownGoing Down
Going Down

Sun was hot as I climbed down into central circle
Get the Picture?Get the Picture?
Get the Picture?

Those walls and stairs just kept coming....until finally....
CentreCentre
Centre

I made it to the centre of the circle. I´m the beige blob


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