Blogs from Bungle Bungles, Western Australia, Australia, Oceania

Advertisement


It was a lively night in the bar last night. I was able to watch my beloved Blues enjoy an unexpected triumph on one of the big TV screens. I raised my arms in jubilation at the end of the game and then did a mini-jig in the middle of the room … and no one batted an eyelid. As we walk into breakfast this morning someone’s hosing out the bar. The door to the ladies’ toilet is front and centre. It's adorned with a colourful "Sheilas" sign, and there's a pair of buffalo horns mounted on the wall above it. The mens’, by contrast, is down the end of a dark corridor and has a very small and respectable looking ”Gentlemen” sign perched discretely above its entrance. I’m not quite sure what message we should ... read more
Cathedral Gorge
Bungle Bungles
Issy with Bec

Oceania » Australia » Western Australia » Bungle Bungles August 10th 2019

Visiting Purnululu was one of the main stops that we were looking forward to on this trip. We drove on from Fitzroy Crossing, stopping briefly for fuel in Halls Creek. After much to-ing and fro-ing we decided to camp at a caravan park (Mabel Downs) rather than one of the free camps so we’d feel a little better leaving our gear when we headed down the 50km track into the NP. In the end, Di and Tony were again kind enough to look after the (now) four dogs - Bella and Bailey, Jack and Kimberley - while the rest of us went in for a look. In short, it was pretty damn cool. We did some walks in the South end first including the Domes, Cathedral and Piccininny lookout. They were as picturesque as the professional ... read more
Nath and Suz at the Bungle
Nath in a hole at the Bungle
Amy or Nath at Echidna Chasm

Oceania » Australia » Western Australia » Bungle Bungles August 9th 2017

DAY ELEVEN This morning Kevin and I took an optional helicopter flight over the Bungle Bungles. the Purnulu National Park covers an area of 239,723ha. The banded sandstone domes cover 45,000ha. The park was listed for World Heritage in 2003 because of its natural beauty and geological value. The domes orange and grey bands are caused by the presence (dark) or absence (orange) of cyanobacteria. The orange bands are oxidised iron compounds that have dried out too quickly for the bands to grow. The sandstone was deposited about 360 million years ago. We were so glad that we did. The helicopter was the best way to see the size of area covered by these iconic rock formations. After this everybody went for a walk through the unique orange and black beehive shaped domes. We then proceeded ... read more
_1070028
_1070029
_1070047


It appears that if it is an arid dry area, where it hasn't rained for a couple of months, it rains just for us. The rain clearing as we arose from our dry beds, just enough to settle the dust. A slow start to the day We decided to do The Stonehenge walk and The Domes walk again, whilst the outside of our tents dried. The Domes Walk just as spectacular as before and we walked the extra 150metres into the small pool area which was a couple of metres wide, shallow with green algae. Back to the car we drove the 20kms to do the Stonehenge trail that we didn't have the energy to walk the day before. A 600 metre circuit walk to read and view the plants the aboriginals resourced for living. Nothing ... read more
image.
image.
image.


Larrawa Station to Mabel Downs (Bungle Bungles entrance) Pouched Eggs for breakfast and on the road again. First stop Halls Creek, a community not without cultural problems. Obvious by the corrugated, no windows and bars on shop fronts. Halls Creek European settlement began because of the Gold Rush and Cattle Industry. The white settlers and original aboriginal land owners fighting over the land resources. There are many prominent people who form the history of Halls Creek, one such character that caught our eye was 'Russian Jack' legend says he pushed a heavily hand-made wheelbarrow 300kms with a sick fellow gold prospector in it. A 2 hour stop over for lunch, groceries, meat and a new swag, burning a very big hole in our wallets. Even further burnt because the ATM machine was empty of cash and ... read more


Purnululu National Park home to the Bungle Bungles. A early start, caravan put in storage and we are ready to tent camp. A 53km drive to the National Park Ranger Information Station. The road full of sharp limestone rocks, corrugated with a couple of rocky river crossings. Booked in with the Ranger we travelled to Waladi Camp ground home for 2 nights. Basic drop toilets and bore water taps. Picking an area to camp we opened our Marquee and camp chairs and ate a very early lunch. Purnululu National Park covers 239,723ha. The Bungle Bungle Range consists of a spectacular array of banded sandstone domes. These dramatic sculptures are allegedly unrivalled in their scale, grandeur and diversity of form. Not seen anywhere in the world. Hence in 2003 it was classified a World Heritage Area, based ... read more
The Domes
image.
image.


Pouched Eggs for breakfast and on the road again. First stop Halls Creek, a community not without cultural problems. Obvious by the corrugated, no windows and bars on shop fronts. Halls Creek European settlement began because of the Gold Rush and Cattle Industry. The white settlers and original aboriginal land owners fighting over the land resources. There are many prominent people who form the history of Halls Creek, one such character that caught our eye was 'Russian Jack' legend says he pushed a heavily hand-made wheelbarrow 300kms with a sick fellow gold prospector in it. A 2 hour stop over for lunch, groceries, meat and a new swag, burning a very big hole in our wallets. Even further burnt because the ATM machine was empty of cash and the shops refusing to give cash with ... read more
image.


There was still a lot to see in the northern end of Purnululu NP so we weren't going to worry about a slight engine noise. Unfortunately, the wet season had damaged a walk called Mini Palms so we headed off to the Homestead walk instead. This was a pleasant walk (but no sign of any homestead). It was getting quite hot though and now we had no aircon. We continued on to the end of the track where there is another lookout and the main feature of the north, Echidna Chasm. This feature has been created by water seeping in from the top of the escarpment and carving a deep (but narrow) tunnel through the rocks. At some points, it is just wide enough to walk through. We arrived just before midday to maximise the photographic ... read more
Homestead walk
Another view from Homestead Walk
Another view from Homestead Walk


We travelled down the highway to the Bungles and turned off the road to drive the 50 plus kms in to the Park (through Mabel Downs station). It was quite a rough track with some easy creek crossings but some very bumpy and corrugated sections to contend with (and cattle of course). We took it slowly and carefully and it was about two and a half hours to travel the 50 kms to the Visitor Centre. There is a nice campsite about half way in called Calico Springs where you can stop. From there we had another drive (on a better road) of about 10 kms to our campsite in the south of the park (Walardi). The Park had only re-opened officially (after the wet season) in the last few weeks. The Walardi campsite has no ... read more
Tributary of the Ord River
Picnic shelter at Piccaninny
Walks available from Piccaninny

Oceania » Australia » Western Australia » Bungle Bungles September 5th 2013

For many years I have wanted to visit the Bungle Bungles in WA. The road in is currently in need of repair after a busy dry season, and certainly not a road I would take the Mercedes MH over, so with Marg's (nervous) blessing, I took a 45 minute flight from Warmun (Turkey Creek) over the Bungle Bungles. Its not until you get up and over this area that you can comprehend the size and diversity of the region. As the flight departs Warmun, the flight path crosses Mabel Downs Station where there are supposed to be 20,000 head of cattle. Didn't see one! Not long after crossing the vast plain, the country quickly becomes quite folded where the tectonic plates at some point have moved dramatically. One side of each ridge is a gentle incline, ... read more
Crossing Mabel Downs
Tectonic folds and ridged
Deep scars and gorges




Tot: 0.07s; Tpl: 0.012s; cc: 8; qc: 82; dbt: 0.0218s; 1; m:saturn w:www (104.131.125.221); sld: 1; ; mem: 1.4mb