San Cristobel


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Published: February 15th 2007
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San CristobelSan CristobelSan Cristobel

Typical street.
This was a beautiful place. Located high up in the mountains where there seems to be a fresh, sunny climate all year round. And for a small indigenous village, there is a suprisingly wide choice of accommodation and bars with live music (we actually saw an excellent jazz band).

The people are reserved but incredibly helpful so there is no problem about catching lifts or transport to explore some of the lush, nearby jungle. Unfortunately, it seems that most people opt for tours where everything is sewn up and subsequently contact with locals is minimal.

We took a lot of collectivo's. The thing about taking them is that it seems you can never catch just the one collectivo to where you want to go. Instead, it seems every journey involves getting off one bus and squeezing into another, or blindly waiting at the side of a road hoping that another will come by and pick you up, that isn't full or with one wheel missing or worse. Also, don't be alarmed to be driving down the middle or on the wrong side of most roads, or sometimes not even on the road in these collectivo's, because the state of
San CristobelSan CristobelSan Cristobel

Selling cures at the market. A big crowd had gathered which unfortunately I didn't capture as cameras were not really tolerated.
most of the roads in Chiapas are not the best. The obvious question seems to be, when is a pot hole no longer a pot hole and more of an obstruction or huge crator?

But it's the ONLY way to travel. Besides keeping the heart rate up, it gives you a glimpse into another way of life. Smiling at the kids, a shared joke about something and or passing round the bag of whatever it may be, for anyone to help themselves, is what makes travelling. That is communication. That is human beings behaving as human beings.

In San Cristobel, I stayed at the YHA hostel where I met Richard and said goodbye to Leonid.
Richard wanted to explore as much as I did, and in fact was planning to live for a while in San Cristobel so was up for checking out the area, including taking a trip out to the nearby village of Alaca & it's beautifully tranquil river.

We took a picnic including Richard's guitar.


Additional photos below
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San CristobelSan Cristobel
San Cristobel

Main plaza - me and Leonid.
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San Cristobel

Cowboy and bag lady at the market.
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San Cristobel

The market.
Alaca Alaca
Alaca

The family on the ox and cart came towards me and it took me ages to get my camera out, they passed me on the bridge before I could take the shot.
Alaca Alaca
Alaca

Walk to the river.
Alaca Alaca
Alaca

Kids playing by the side of the river.
Alaca Alaca
Alaca

The unspoilt river.
Alaca Alaca
Alaca

Richard, any excuse!


19th February 2007

Swallowed by Anaconda
Maybe the firmest, yet most supple ass I have ever seen! Just for your info, the name of the place was Alcala and the old colonial city is called San Cristobal - yes there are a few bells, but not Cristobel. Just thought I would get a little anal on you, heh heh. Cheers and welcome home to drudgery and dismality (is that a word?); either way London embodies it. I miss you, luv.

Tot: 2.433s; Tpl: 0.055s; cc: 15; qc: 70; dbt: 0.0483s; 2; m:saturn w:www (104.131.125.221); sld: 1; ; mem: 1.4mb