EdVallance's Guestbook



19th April 2011

Many thanks to everyone for the kind words. Scott: if I have time I take notes, if not then I don't. On Yamal and in Tajikistan for example there were times when I was sitting around doing nothing for a few hours so I would just note down all my eimpressions and every conversation I could remember. In Afghanistan and Kamchatka though I had no spare time so made no notes. It's all just from memory. My mempoy for what people say is pretty good though, I guess because I'm so fascinated by people themselves, their lives, their opinions and experiences. Re being journalistic - I guess yes, I often think about how I will write something up when I see it or hear it. My three main interests are travel, people and writing, so to be able to combine them all in one (publishing a book) would be a dream come true. Writing up my experiences is almost as enjoyable as the travel itself for me.
19th April 2011

Your blogs are AMAZING!!
18th April 2011

My two favorite travelbloggers
I got into trouble stating that guys are really good travel writers, not meaning to imply that the girls aren't. Both Ed and Scott are who I had in mind. Both are truly amazing writers. I look forward to Ed's continued adventures to remote areas, and I hope Scott and Anny return to the road soon.
18th April 2011

I am truly captivated by the Kamchatka region of Russia more than any other part of this vast and mysterious land. It was a pleasure reading it, even if I was mildly jealous of you being there! All your blogs have been great and I really enjoying reading them. Dave
18th April 2011

Again, you travel to these places so we don't have to! And I'm glad you do, as it sounds a truly miserable place. Your writing improves with every post, especially your use of dialogue which, in the absence of long descriptive passages, manages to perfectly convey the atmosphere of a place. Your travels, though intrepid and often far flung, are, to me, more a journey into the universal human condition than they are to a specific location. With you, the personal speaks far more eloquently than the place. I am interested; when conversing with the people you meet on your travels do you take notes, make recordings? Or are you some kind of eidetiker? I only ask as the amount of perfectly pitched dialogue that so beautifully illuminates your blogs must take some remembering. I understand that you use these blogs as a way of cataloguing your thoughts and experiences with a mind to one day publishing some of them in some form or other (something I), with that in mind I was interested how much of your travels is now almost reportage, or journalistic? Are you always conscious of your work when travelling, or do you organise your thoughts at a later date? Anyway, what I meant to say, was great work, thank you!
18th April 2011

Again, you travel to these places so we don't have to! And I'm glad you do, as it sounds a truly miserable place. Your writing improves with every post, especially your use of dialogue which, in the absence of long descriptive passages, manages to perfectly convey the atmosphere of a place. Your travels, though intrepid and often far flung, are, to me, more a journey into the universal human condition than they are to a specific location. With you, the personal speaks far more eloquently than the place. I am interested; when conversing with the people you meet on your travels do you take notes, make recordings? Or are you some kind of eidetiker? I only ask as the amount of perfectly pitched dialogue that so beautifully illuminates your blogs must take some remembering. I understand that you use these blogs as a way of cataloguing your thoughts and experiences with a mind to one day publishing some of them in some form or other (something I), with that in mind I was interested how much of your travels is now almost reportage, or journalistic? Are you always conscious of your work when travelling, or do you organise your thoughts at a later date? Anyway, what I meant to say, was great work, thank you!
18th April 2011

"You know on Kamchatka we have one black man and one gay, and Denis knows them both." I laughed hard at that. Great shots, by the way.
18th April 2011
The road from the airport to Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky

Love it
Wowee! That is one fabulous shot!
9th April 2011
Horse fighting 2

I am against the cruelty they are doing to man's best friend and reliable helper.
7th April 2011

interesting read
I live in the Philippines, have been to Palawan, but am not aware that while tourists are enjoying the sights and the sea some locals are actually dying diving for rocks in the same sea. Pretty depressing. I don't think a documentary news was ever made about this yet. The people should know about this.
5th April 2011

Taloctoc and Mangali
Yes Jena, I went to Mangali and Taloctoc. Both great places. I went to the Taloctoc with the Lubuagan people when they went to renew their Peace Pact. I stayed with the very kind Sincawa family and remember much drinking basi, ghansa dancing, listening to speeches and eating more and more carabao and rice. I went to Mangali with the family of a many called Jerome, from Lubo, for the funeral of his mother in law. Again, much basi, gin, rice, carabao. There was one funny time when they told me that everyone must cry at a funeral. Many old people crying as they said things by Jerome's mother in law's dead body. 'Do you know how to cry, ben?'. They were very serious. Even the 'Canoo' must cry. So I went to a quiet place and imagined all the bad things that might happen in my life - my mother died, my dog died etc etc. When I was in 'the zone' I said I was ready to cry. This was the best joke of the funeral! You have a tradition of the practical joke in Kalinga, I think. It was a happy time really, especially for a funeral. Ben
1st April 2011

Kamchatka
Эдвард, желаем тебе удачного путешествия на одно из самых удивительных мест в России, Камчатка. Обязательно покупайся в Гейзерах! Ждем твою историю!
From Blog: Beyond the woods
29th March 2011
Tumihay's father

Tumihai's father, Diklay, died in the 1990's, so this cannot be him. I know this with complete certainty.
22nd March 2011

Hi Ed, I'm a journalist with CNN and i've been reading your blog entries quite alot lately and i love the way you write. I think we should hire you to write features for our site hehe. One thing though, why you wrote so less about Khorog (Tajikistan) ? and if you have to sum up your Khorog or Badakhshan jaunt in a sentence what will write..? I know its not a right entry to post questions about Khorog but still as its your latest entry so I'm asking you. Take care mate
From Blog: Beyond the woods
22nd March 2011

Exactly what you expect Russia to look like!
How very Russian your pictures are. Snowy churches, it couldn't be more typical.Your story is good as always. Personally I prefer the longer name you suggested: Pereslavl Natakomzherasstoyaniiotlesakakilyuboydrugoygorodvrossiisky just has a nice ring to it!
From Blog: Beyond the woods
21st March 2011

Nice read, as always. But what I really enjoyed about this blog were the photos. I know you are not so keen on photography, indeed I've read you stating that you don't really know what constitutes a good image, but these shots are really decent. You got a new camera? Taking more of an interest? He he, anyway, thanks!
From Blog: Beyond the woods
20th March 2011

City name
Hi Ed! Pereslavl Zalessky is a nice town. I've been there in Summer, though. Have you visited famous museums of irons and kettles? I just wanted to note that Pereslavl Zalessky was named this way not because people in XII century wanted to stress that the city is located beyond the woods. The thing is that the city was founded by emigrants from Pereslavly located in the south (now it is known as Pereslavl Khmelnitsky, Ukraine). Zalesie was a name of a territory north to the Kiev, which was capital that time. So, new settlers gave the city a name of their hometown, but to distinguish them, they gave it a second name.
From Blog: Beyond the woods
19th March 2011

people and light
this, for me, was the most amazing blog ever. it almost hurt to read it because it made me want to be there and see these amazing people myself. that's what good travel writing and images do - make people long to be there. tracey
27th February 2011

trditional bali yap vedios
I would like Traditional Bali and Yap prople vedios & fotos
25th February 2011
Nenets driving reindeer sledge, Yamal Peninsula

exicelint imagesh
hi
18th February 2011

taga romblon ako mga ramilo ang nanay ko
taga romblon ako
17th February 2011
Nenets man getting ready to head off on a reindeer sledge at daybreak, Yamal Peninsula

Stunning lighting and composition. One of those rare photos that has a "sense of place".
16th February 2011

actually I live in England and there are not many really "healthy things". There is a much bigger and tastier variety of fruits and veg in the Philippines and they are more organic and GM free. This woman's teeth are not like that from unhealthy eating but from an addiction to betel nut chewing.
16th February 2011
Mangyan teeth

to poor people in different countrys
who has bad teeth come to england and get heathy toothpaist and eat more haelthy things you can eat about 3 or 4 sweet things a day please sponsor a child whith it to.

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