EdVallance's Guestbook



18th November 2009

Great blog, as always. What part of Moscow do you live in? Any chance you could blow the snow this way, it's just grey and tepid here!
10th November 2009

thanks for the kind words guys!
From Blog: Metro Zombies
9th November 2009

The best story I have read on travelblog by far. thank you.
From Blog: Metro Zombies
9th November 2009

Incredible.....
Ed, you never fail to amaze me. For such a simple plot such as a metro station, you surely can write!!!! I certainly enjoy "simple experiences" loaded with all the interesting details such as this blog. Reminds me too of some of Jonathan C's blogs on simple plots, loaded with details. Sorry for the comparison. But you, Jon and Jason (aspiring nomad) surely top my list of fav bloggers.
From Blog: Metro Zombies
9th November 2009

Отличный блог!
Yep, sounds about right! Moscow is a fascinating city but every day there made my head hurt. Your 'angle' on the commute is spot on: you describe the unappealing parts without whinging and throw in the beautiful bits at just the right moments.
From Blog: Metro Zombies
9th November 2009

Time is the best healer, always.
I know how it feels...I can relate to you....Each time I come back from a trip, short or long I think I will be productive and work hard, but the only think I think about is my next trip and how dull is to be back! Life is unfair for travellers, it's like we are not part of the real world even though we are the ones who really see it . Time is the best healer, always. X Milena
8th November 2009

hi!
hey Ria! thanks for the comments. Actually I found Belarussians to be very friendly and interested in foreigners in general. However, in some of these ex-Soviet countries there's a tradition of people who work in shops and restaurants being extremely unfriendly to everyone, foreigner or local. It's called "Soviet service". Hope you're well! How have you're plans progressed?
8th November 2009

Guess you're back completely (from the attack). Congratulations. It's an achievement. I'm glad this time you had a good bike, not broken shoes=)! I have one stupid question by the way, why some Belarusian seemed so averse to foreigner? If it's not tourist destination, it usually has more interest in foreigners. Or that's how I thought. It's nice to hear the complete version of your story. Last time I heard was after the Lithuanian immigration asked you, "Where do you live in Lithuania?" and you said,"I don't know, but I remember the bus stop,"
8th November 2009

Kudos!
Good for you for succeeding in your ambitious goal... I just completed a 65km bike ride around the Sea of Galilee in Israel, and then got home to read of your amazing cycling feat. My piddly bike ride doesn't seem like so much by comparison :) Much respect!
8th November 2009

Asking for permission
Dear EdVallance, I'm Heart, from Vietnam. I'm the admin of Wata website, which offers English learners a place to practise speaking English. You can check it out here: www.watavn.org Besides, I also manage a magazine called Walkie Talkie Magazine (deliver for free). Readers may read it online or download it (for free) to learn the writing styles, as well as to learn others' experience. All is for the mere educational purpose. One of the column I'm about to make use of is: Travelling. I pass by your blog in here, and I love to use your travelling writing to publish. Is it possible if you can allow me to use it? Is there any chance that I can have your email so that we can discuss in details? Thanks for your kind attention. And for further contact, pls drop me a note at: hung.hathe@gmail.com Regards,
6th November 2009

Just..chill!
Hi Ed, sorry to hear (or read even) that you're obviously feeling down at the moment. You've learned a hell of a lot about life being on the road for 2 years, no one's expecting you to immediately be able to adjust back again. As another Berkshire dweller I know what you mean about the complacent way of life here, petty neighbours, everyone having too much money to really care about the outside world, and all that crap. You don't even need to 'adjust' back, you just need time to think. Everything else, like the book, can wait. All the best.
6th November 2009

Cheer Up :)
Nice to see a new entry from you. Ohhhh, I miss England ^^ Whatever you're up to at the moment, hope you're feeling better :)
6th November 2009

all too painfully true...
yo bro, fantastic blog! what horrible truths and disappointing realities we come from which few realize... unless they step outside and look in. i return in two weeks after being on the road for 18 months... i wonder how long it'll be before i'm off again. "wandering re-establishes the original harmony which existed between man and the universe." -- anatole france. if wandering re-establishes the harmony, what then maintains it? (i wonder) until before you are off again... welcome home! there's no place like it.
6th November 2009

I feel ya...
I returned home in June after only a year of travel and I feel exactly the same way. It's nice to know I'm not the only one... Broke and unemployed after my extended trip really doesn't help with the transition. Good luck adjusting and welcome home!
6th November 2009

Ah, those post-travel blues! Know the feeling! In time things return to some semblance of normality, and you just have to except that while you've changed, the place where you live and everyone else you know has not! Ultimately there's only one cure available... get a job, save like buggery and hit the road again! Travelling can be tough at times, but ironically nowhere near as tough as settling in back home! Fourteen years on, I'm still loving it, and not looking forward at all to going home (again!) next month, even if the home I'm going back to is on the other side of the world from the one I left all those years ago. But at the end of the day, you've got to remember It's All Good. Enjoy!
5th November 2009

what is "home"?
Hey Eddy, I've also come home recently after 2 years in China. And alone, since I can't bring my wife with me to Canada. So far I can't find a job doing what I like. . and living in my parent's basement. It doesn't do much for the self-esteem. I guess I do have the motivation to find work since I know it's the only way I can hope to sponsor and bring my girl over here. .but yeah coming home is tough! Sorry to hear about the breakup. She was a great travel companion and probably saved your life by being there for you when you were sick. But I'm guessing she wanted to settle down..all girls do at some point. Don't start writing a book until you feel the time is right. I think your adventures are not over yet because you still feel restless! Keep up the journals, that alone will make up most of a book if you do write one. keep on keeping on! Daniel
30th October 2009

mindanao
there are a lot of beautiful places n mindanao.....only that only few were able to witness them
29th October 2009

Check this out. :) http://www.travelblog.org/Topics/21112-1.html
22nd October 2009

Close call
Wow - do you always work your guardian angels so hard?
22nd October 2009

Close
Wow - do you always work your guardian angels so hard?
15th October 2009

hoax
dont be inclined to think that the actual psychic surgery is real. like WHAT TINNIE had said it is probably the belief that you are healed of an illness you dont even have (lol) through faith that you are going to be cured thru this ridiculous practice.
11th October 2009

nice work.. thank you for visiting Mindanao..
11th October 2009

on war
I'd like to tell the world that the existing war in Mindanao is not a matter of Christian-Muslim rival. its is the result of the greediness of "SOME" previous and reigning leaders, and of course the lack of respect in individual differences. it is not that Muslims are bad, Christians are good or vice versa issue. I keep hearing from the media that Mindanao is in trouble, is a dangerous place because of the bombing and kidnapping issue. Let me tell you guys, there are only few PLACES in Mindanao that are affected by war not the whole Mindanao. if you guys would only see the real an hidden beauty of Mindanao, you would say its a living yet suffering paradise in the Southern Philippines.
28th September 2009

It's a nice piece of writing, Eddy. I want to hear more about your travel, so please keep writing. I still wonder a bit why the diagnosis came passably late. Your symptoms were very typical of conventional malaria. You were very good example for case-report lol (sorry, it's not very tactful of me). In Indonesia, Papua in particular, you would be sent directly for RDT - test for malaria. But even if the test isn't available, in here with your symptoms we are allowed to treat patients with quinine and antibiotics. The decision relies on clinical signs and symptoms. I'm pretty sure there was hardly any malaria in Mongolia, so it doesn't come as the first differential diagnosis. Anyway, your near-death experience must make you be more aware of being alive. Reading yours, I can empathise with patients' agony through attacks. We saw too many severe malaria patients that it just becomes mere job. Thank you for sharing.

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