A Small Swede in the Big World's Guestbook



28th May 2018

Catching up...
So this is the blog where you first met Takae :) For so many reasons, I love the story of people praying to the god of another religion when their own religion is oppressed...
28th April 2018

Hachiko
Aw, what a very touching story about Hachiko the dog, thank you for sharing. The noodle meals sound delicious :)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
28th April 2018

Hachiko
Thank you. :) One day I'll make it out to visit his grave as well and pay my respects more properly. :)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
25th April 2018

Hachikō, the famous Akita dog
Reminds me of Greyfriars Bobby, the dog who guarded his master's grave for 14 years in Edinburgh and a heartrending film was made about it. Yet the story of Hachiko you say may lead to his master's partner's grave to be relocated in May so the three rest together. What a triumph for love and undying loyalty...brilliant.
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
25th April 2018

Hachikō, the famous Akita dog
I've read about Greyfriars Bobby but I haven't watched the movie about him. I think the loyalty of animals are truly astounding. :) And the grave was indeed relocated with representatives of both families attending so now the whole family rests together. :)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
24th April 2018
Hachikō

It was the RG movie I saw
It was the Richard Gere movie I saw. The Japanese version I don't know anything about. /Ake
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
24th April 2018
Hachikō

It was the RG movie I saw
It's a great movie. :)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
24th April 2018
Hachikō

I can recommend the film
They made a film about it. It was nice flick. /Ake
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
24th April 2018
Hachikō

I can recommend the film
Aye, Hachi: A Dog's Tale with Richard Gere and Hachiko Monogatari from 1987. I've only seen the Richard Gere movie yet, but I want to see the original Japanese version as well. :)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
23rd April 2018

Thanks
I visited Tokyo for the first time last year, and I will visit again. I spent two weeks there and barely scratched the surface. You blogs have pointed out several places I want to visit on my next trip, namely the graves of Hachikō and Ueno Hidesaburō - and his companion - as well as Kanda Jinga.
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
23rd April 2018

Thanks
Thank you! I'm happy that you find them useful. Aye, it feels like everywhere I go in Japan I come out with 10 times more things I want to visit than I had when I went in despite keeping full schedules. =)
From Blog: Undying Loyalty
21st April 2018

Japanese History
Wow, you certainly know your Japanese history - very impressive! I'm a big fan myself of reading up about the history of a country before visiting it, it certainly helps you to understand the country in the modern day.
From Blog: Tainted Memories
21st April 2018

Japanese History
I agree fully my friend. Learning about the history of where I go is a big part of the enjoyment. :) Japan holds a special place in my heart though of course, but so much of the history here is a lot more complex and deep than first meets the eye and I'm constantly finding myself challenged on everything I thought I knew. :D
From Blog: Tainted Memories
18th April 2018
Sakuraniku!

Horse meat
What an amazing introduction you had to Japan! I had no idea horse meat was a thing in Japan. Is that wasabi on the side? You've also reminded me of how much I used to love Pocky. I'll need to look for some :)
From Blog: Tainted Memories
19th April 2018
Sakuraniku!

Horse meat
You can find so much fascinating and delicious food in Japan, I kept being amazed by the food for the whole trip. :) I love pocky as well and we've finally gotten them at my local candy shop! :D
From Blog: Tainted Memories
18th April 2018
Subway Station

It works! How's that even possible?
We were in Japan a few years ago. We absolutely loved it and we want to go back again in the near future. I noticed something fascinating in the Tokyo metro. In the most busy stations they have rectangles painted on the platform and in the rectangles there are lines drawn perpendicular to the train. The lines indicates where people are allowed to stand and wait for the trains to arrive. People enter the rectangles and patiently wait their turn. When the first rectangle in full people may stand and wait in a second one which is painted next to it. The first rectangle in labelled "first train" and the second rectangle is labelled "second train". When a train arrives the people in the first rectangle board the train and the people in the second rectangle move over to the first rectangle and wait for the next train. The crazy thing is - it works! How's that even possible? /Ake
From Blog: Tainted Memories
19th April 2018
Subway Station

It works! How's that even possible?
I know, it's really amazing looking at it with our Swedish eyes, we're nowhere even remotely near to that precision! But there is a whole different level of respect in Japan, both to your fellow citizens but also to your profession. I mean just how the staff bows to the train as it comes into the station or the staff bows when they enter an exits the cars.
From Blog: Tainted Memories
17th April 2018

History of Japan
Another fascinating chapter in your annals of the History of Japan, Per-Olof. I am fascinated by Yasukuni Jinja, the shrine whose purpose was to house the souls of those who gave the ultimate sacrifice for Japan since 1853 . How are the names of 2,466,532 men, women, children and even various pets inscribed here? Sounds like a lot of names and effort to record in stone or in handwriting or otherwise.
From Blog: Tainted Memories
18th April 2018

History of Japan
Thank you my dancing friend. They are indeed inscribed by hand in writing, and not only their names but also their origin, birth dates and place of death. I went back and expanded a bit on that section of the post, also adding some of the names that are inscribed and some that are not. ;-)
From Blog: Tainted Memories
11th April 2018

Tokyo
Blimey - again, I'm amazed at how much you fit into just one day of your travels, even after a long-haul flight from Europe! I look forward to reading more about your first trip to Japan :)
12th April 2018

Tokyo
Haha, thanks man! We have a saying/motto in Sweden that goes "fullt ös medvetslös" it means roughly, "keep going at full steam until you pass out". I try to live by this on my travels. :D
8th April 2018

Viking History
Very interesting for me to read about Viking History from the Scandinavian side. My own learnings of the Vikings come from my growing up in Yorkshire, site of multiple marauding invasions of the Vikings. It is interesting to read about them from the Scandinavian perspective. I look forward to reading about your travels in Japan :)
8th April 2018

Viking History
Aye, you guys really got the brunt of it down there. :D I hope you'll enjoy my write ups from Japan and find some inspiration for your own Japan trip. :)

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