My Africa Diary Video Blog - the Masai land!


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Published: April 28th 2019
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Feeling sad! Yes, this would be the last video blog of my epic journey across Africa before my unceremonious exit from the continent. Yes, I fell in love with the continent that attracts me like a magnet with its rugged but beautiful wilderness, it’s fascinating wild life and its legendary Masai tribe. This is a slideshow of the Masai village in Ngorongoro.

Let me admit it, I have an obsession about the Masai people. They continue to fascinate me from my childhood. Allow me to rewind a few decades. My father was a great storyteller and he lived and breathed into the wilderness of Assam in North east India. I recall the days when I was a kid and I used to curl up to him listening to his stories of the wild world in rainy days. Some days it was the Borneo story, and some other days it was Africa and the Masai. Outside, the tropical rain of the Indian subcontinent poured over the tin roof of our home. Amid the symphony of the monsoon rain, I used to listen to my father the fairy tales of the Masai people with my eyes wide open. He used to tell
the story with his hypnotic style of how brave the Masai people are, how do they fight the lions with the spears only and how do they travel in the wilderness of the African Savannas totally fearless. His art of storytelling was so great that those stories made a lasting impression on me. When I finally headed to Tanzania, I made it a point to stop in the Masai village in Ngorongoro.

If you are heading to Serengeti Game Park in Tanzania from Arusha, cross the highway leading to Manyara on your right and head straight to enter the gate of Ngorongoro. Once you cross the Ngorongoro crater, the Masai village would be on your way to the Serengeti. The landscape is arid, the hills are barren beyond the Ngorongoro crater and trees work hard for their survival. You can see the cattle scattered around the barren hills, sometimes a Masai boy on the distant hills herding the cattle, sometimes a lone Masai woman on the side of the unpaved mountain road. We parked our cruiser just outside the village, an enclosed area with a broken wooden fence. We were greeted by the 97 years old Masai chief and
that was the start of my journey in the Masai village. This gave me an opportunity to learn the nomadic life of the Masai people. Can I fathom myself living in such a lifestyle? Not a chance. But that is the way the Masai people live for generations. They don’t want to live a life that make them bonded to some place for ever. They are born free and they don’t adopt a comfortable lifestyle like ours in exchange of their freedom. It reminded me what Denis Fynch said in my favourite movie “Out of Africa”, “I don’t want to live someone else’s idea of how to live.” So true! I wish, I could blend into that philosophy of life. This is my last slide show from Africa. Hope you enjoy!



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28th April 2019

Farewell African vBlog!
Loved reading about Ngorongoro! I too am feeling sad because this is the last VBlog in the series.
28th April 2019

Farewell African vBlog!
Thank you Nitin! I am happy to share my experiences and am glad that you enjoyed it. Hope to capture more in the near future!
28th April 2019

Its been great following you on your African journey, Tab and I will miss watching your excellent video blogs as they brought back so many happy memories too.. I am sure though that it will not be long before you are back in the continent of your dreams. 'The more one sees of Africa the more one want to see' ... ... .... so until then best regards Sheila PS - I hope the leg is on the mend .. .. ..
28th April 2019

Your comment!
Good Morning from snowy Calgary Sheila! Yes, we had a snow storm last night. Thank you for your comment. My readers/viewers like you keep me motivated. I know I have less takers of the video blogs, however I keep my passion alive for friends like you. Yes, I hope to be back in the continent as soon as I am healed. I also browsed your blogs on India and started reading them. They are a wealth of information. You should consider compile them and publish them in a paperback or hard copy book. I do the same.
29th April 2019

Unceremonious exit
You are continuing the tradition of being a great story teller. Your father has influenced you well. You've shared a people and place you love and the bravery of the people and animals. We very much want to go to this neck of the world and experience some of the things you have described. Each country is different!
29th April 2019

Unceremonious exit
Wow! Great story teller! Thank you for the accolade MJ. When it comes from you, it makes my day. I know my storytelling perhaps attract only a certain section of the readers, but I am content if I could share this with like minded people. Yes, by all means, please travel those places. And I will wait to hear those tales from you MJ. Oh yes, my new book would be published in a few months time...it's in publisher's house for edit at the moment...What book? Well, I will keep it as a surprise!
30th April 2019

The Masai
When we were in Kenya and Tanzania some years ago there was debate as to whether the Masai would be restricted by governments from continuing their nomadic lifestyle as it impinged upon the pastures claimed by other tribes. But the Masai were fiercely independent and insisted on maintaining their tradition of freedom of movement against all pressures to change. It is great you could see them as they wish to be seen...'cos who knows how long they will be allowed to continue so. Enjoyed your video series Tab and hope it helped your healing physically and spiritually following your unfortunate injury that had you carried out of there.
30th April 2019

The Masai
Dave, I was not aware about the government initiative about restricting the Masai from their nomadic lifestyle. You know, having seen the history of the indigenous people in Canada and I am sure you have seen the same in Australia, I believe the Masai people should be allowed to continue with their life style. That said, who knows how long they would be allowed to do that? I echo your sentiment, Dave. As for my leg is concerned, it is not fully healed yet; I tried to climb the hills recently thinking I am fine to do so, and I realized I have to listen to my body. I am itching to hit the road again, but I guess I have to wait a bit more longer...oh, crap..what can I say? Dave, thank you for viewing and enjoying the video series! Means a lot to me.
19th May 2019

Africa
Your love for Africa and the Masai really come across clearly here. I love your descriptions of your father telling you stories during a rainstorm in Assam. It is clear that the Masai people and way of life are special to you. I hope your leg is now fully on the mend.
19th May 2019

Africa
Indeed, my father's many of the attributes have clearly reflected in what do in my life today. Africa is one of them. Hope to set my foot there again once I heal. How is your planning coming along for Peru? My new book on my Peru travel is with the publisher now...should be out in a few months.
19th May 2019

Peru
I hope you heal soon. My plans for Peru are coming along nicely. I'll be there in a couple of months now 😊 Planning my time in Lima, Paracas/Nazca and Iquitos, before heading north to Ecuador and the Galapagos. How exciting publishing a book on your Peru travels! All the best with this.
19th May 2019

Peru
Excellent planning Alex...all the best...looking forward to the blogs already and the famous images!!!

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