Page 3 of Vinovat Sudarynya Travel Blog Posts


Europe » United Kingdom » England » Greater London » Holborn December 22nd 2008

Maybe it’s because I’m not a Londoner, that I love London so. I grew up in Sussex just an hour away from the capital, but the journey on the train was always so expensive that the only opportunities I had to experience life in the big city were when my parents would take me to watch sport. My Dad and I used to lose our voices singing "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" at the Twickenham rugby 'Sevens' each spring, and bring fleeces and flasks to watch cricket at Lord's or the Oval every summer. My Mum took me to the Olympia horse show in the Christmas holidays. Until I was fifteen I must have thought that the city was just a collection of sports grounds. The real London is still a mystery to me. I look forward ... read more
London: a wonderful city.
Fun in the sun.
Rainy street.

Europe » Ukraine » Kyiv November 1st 2008

The best answer to why I haven't written anything since August is "I've just been too busy": when the law firm where I was working finalised a merger I found myself doing three jobs - translating, editing and proofreading - for two companies. I worked late most nights before going straight home to bed. It was a stressful autumn, but there were good moments: sipping hot chocolate with Ana on Saturday evenings in the Shokoladnitsa café on vulytsya Chervonoarmiyska; finding a homeless puppy at the entrance to our building one Friday night and taking care of it for a few days; seeing Jamie, a friend who I studied with in Russia, when he came to Kyiv in September, and taking him to the Champions League football match between Dynamo and Arsenal; bumping into Kish, a Ukrainian ... read more
Dynamo Kyiv fans celebrate a goal against Arsenal
St. Michael's monastery
"Coffee House"

Europe August 4th 2008

I'll write up the diaries from the first part of my summer trip when I have the time. In the meantime, here are some holiday snaps of Yalta, the Southern Crimean port next to the Black Sea, where..... * Ana and I rented a room in an uncomfortable, small stone cottage that belonged to a tiny Armenian woman named Anna Vakhrudinovna, her two sons and their fiancées. * We bought an inflatable green hoop and swam every day in the Black Sea - which was warmer than anything I had showered under during the rest of July. * You can see bodies of all shapes and sizes tucked into bikinis, from the incredibly heavenly to the incredibly heavy. * I wondered whether Russians take the socks out of the front of their swimming trunks before they ... read more
Mountains by Vorontsovskii Palace.
Vorontsovskii Palace gardens.
Ana.

Europe July 30th 2008

I haven't got around to writing much since my trip to Hungary last summer. I would be lying if I said I haven't had the time - it's more a case of me having lost my mojo, now I'm not able to scribble my ideas down in lunch-hour long bursts and without Mr. Volkov's coffee machine to boost my imagination. Perhaps one day an article about Budapest will materialise; I still have my notes, and some of them even make sense. The Hungarian word for 'flowers', virag - written on florists' windows across Budapest - sounds like the Russian word for 'enemy', vrag - hence the working title "Flowers From My Enemy". Below is the beginning of a story I wrote about my journey from Hungary to Ukraine: "An hour or so before dusk on a ... read more
Cherubs.
Budapest panorama.
Budapest skyline.

Europe » Hungary July 29th 2008

I haven't got around to writing much since my trip to Hungary last summer. I would be lying if I said I haven't had the time - it's more a case of me having lost my mojo, now I'm not able to scribble my ideas down in lunch-hour long bursts and without Mr. Volkov's coffee machine to boost my imagination. Perhaps one day an article about Budapest will materialise; I still have my notes, and some of them even make sense. Below is the beginning of a story I wrote about my journey from Hungary to Ukraine: "An hour or so before dusk on a chilly late summer evening I stepped onto the train at Budapest Nyugati station. As we pulled away from the platform I stayed in the corridor for a while rather than going ... read more
Pest street.
The Basilica.
Pest street.

Europe » Hungary » Central Hungary July 28th 2008

I haven't got around to writing much since my trip to Hungary last summer. I would be lying if I said I haven't had the time - it's more a case of me having lost my mojo, now I'm not able to scribble my ideas down in lunch-hour long bursts and without Mr. Volkov's coffee machine to boost my imagination. Perhaps one day an article about Budapest will materialise; I still have my notes, and some of them even make sense. Below is the beginning of a story I wrote about my journey from Hungary to Ukraine: "An hour or so before dusk on a chilly late summer evening I stepped onto the train at Budapest Nyugati station. As we pulled away from the platform I stayed in the corridor for a while rather than going ... read more
Statue, Buda.
Budapest panorama.
Shoe memorial - for those who were killed during the Second World War.

Europe July 17th 2008

The most entertaining moments in Ukraine are the ones that come around when you least expect them - like a conversation I had in the chemist in my neighbourhood late one night with a man and his dog. They had been chased away from the local market earlier in the day, the man explained with mischievous pride, after the dog had tipped over a stall and stolen a lady's carrots. When they arrived home for dinner the man had treated it to a little bit too much cognac, and they had come to the chemist to find some medicine to calm it down. The tipsy terrier - black and handsomely scruffy - was panting uncontrollably by his master's side, its bright pink tongue flapping around the sides of its mouth; in fact it was in a ... read more
Khreshchatik fountains.
Puddles, vulytsya Mihailovska.
Sparrow.

Europe July 9th 2008

Some pictures that there is no room for in my next diary, or which I missed when writing previous ones, that would otherwise have gone to waste. Some are of a barbecue with friends one Saturday evening - others are from various strolls around the centre of Kyiv, after work or at weekends. As with all of my diaries, click on any photo to enlarge it, and then click on "slideshow" to see them in sequence. Next diary: ... read more
Independence Square skyline.
Russian Orthodox Church.
Olga, shashlyki queen.

Europe July 3rd 2008

The concert by Sir Paul McCartney on Independence Square on June 14th, the biggest outdoor event of Ukraine's year, coincided with a spectacular storm. Rain fell out of a sky the colour of Donbass coal, and saturated our hair and clothes as soon as we stepped out of the metro. The street between Evropeiska Ploshcha and Independence Square flooded, in the time it took Ana and me to gratefully slurp a mug of hot tea from the canteen we were taking shelter in. As we tripped in ankle-deep puddles and hurried towards the stage, lightning lit up the sky behind the hotel "Ukrayina" and thunder crackled above us. The rain was falling so hard that the couple behind us were wearing swimming goggles. Irrespective of the weather (that made it tempting to watch it on television ... read more
Sir Paul McCartney concert, Independence Square.
Sir Paul McCartney concert, Independence Square.
Sir Paul McCartney concert, Independence Square.

Europe June 13th 2008

It felt as though I had been away for two months, not two weeks, such had Kyiv changed while I was at home. Rows of chestnut trees had flowered along all of the city's streets and boulevards - their lush green leaves brush against the windowsills of the pink, grey and blue tsarist era buildings, and conceal the bareness of the khrushchevki housing blocks. The smell of freshly cut grass fills the air even in the centre. Summer had arrived. Translations about oil pipelines in Azerbaijan and articles about Ukrainian legislative changes pile up beside me on my desk at work. They are complicated enough to make your head swirl, but there are distractions: the door of the office is always open, which allows not just the warm air to drift in, but also the jazz ... read more
Balcony, Khreshchatik.
Taras Shevchenko park.
Statue of national poet Lesa Ukrainka, in front of Mariinskii Palace.




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